Archive Results For: Internal Waterways

Note: Henry Bell’s Comet: The account book for 1820

By Peter McOwat

This account of the first steam ship, which operated on the route to Fort William  from September 1819, is derived from an account book of the vessel’s operation in 1820. The income and expenditure is recorded, as well as names and wages of crew. The passengers are also listed, giving a social commentary on the […] Read More

Filed under: Nineteenth Century | Other (Nineteenth C) | Shipwrecks | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines

Competition in the Merchant Steamship Market, 1889-1914

By David Humphreys

The merchant steamship market in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was dominated by the UK shipbuilding industry but past studies have portrayed a market characterized by the strong relationships between UK shipbuilders and shipowners where competition between firms was the exception rather than the rule. The objective of this article is to shed […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Shipworm, Hogbacks and Duck’s Arses: the Influence of William May on Sir Robert Seppings

By Alan Lemmers

The improvements in shipbuilding by Sir Robert Seppings in the early nineteenth century represent one of the last major revolutions in the age of the wooden sailing warship. However, little is known about Seppings’s sources of inspiration, a blank that this article attempts to fill in to some extent. Recent historical finds confirm that Seppings […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Biography | Shipbuilding & Design

The Application and Scheme of Paintworks in British Men-of-War in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

By Peter G. Goodwin

The question of the authenticity of the colour scheme for the preserved HMS Victory has been the subject of some debate. This article uses historical evidence and technical analysis of paint samples to draw conclusions about the external and internal appearance of HMS Victory and other ships of this time in both the British and French navies. An investigation […] Read More

Filed under: Nelson | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Miscellaneous | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: The Shadwell Waterfront in the Eighteenth Century

By Derek Morris and Kenneth Cozens

London’s tax registers for the pre-1800 period are now available on line, and this note uses a case study of the Shadwell waterfront to reveal the information contained within them. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines

From Cannon to Steam Propulsion: the Origins of Clyde Marine Engineering

By Michael Moss

This article revisits the origins of the Clyde’s marine engineering works’ contribution to steam propulsion, much of which has previously relied upon hagiographical accounts from contemporaries such as Robert and David Napier. It highlights the role of the Board of Ordnance during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars in expanding its private sector suppliers of […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Science & Exploration | Weapons

Note: Working a Bristol Channel Trading Ketch around 1950

By Peter Thomson

These are the recollections of a mariner who worked in a trading ketch until it was impossible to get either crew or cargo. Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Twentieth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Merchant Marines

Note: Unravelling the Mystery of the Comet Engine

By Martin Bellamy

The Comet was the first commercial steamship in Europe, and this gives the evidence for the engine used. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Merchant Marines

Note: Far from the Water’s Edge: Hayes Boatyard, an inland boatyard in England

By Alison Leighton

The Hayes Boatyard was developed as a result of a powerful father-and-son partnership in the very heart of England. From making agricultural machinery, the innovative engineers diversified into steam powered ship building. They took advantage of a small canal, leading to the Grand Junction Canal, which gave access to the sea. They built vessels destined […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Unravelling the Mystery of the Comet Engine

By Martin Bellamy

The succession of engines fitted to the first commercial steamship in Europe. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Science & Exploration | Shipbuilding & Design

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