Archive Results For: Internal Waterways

Upnor Castle and Gunpowder Supply to the Navy 1801–4

By Andrew Saunders

This article is based on the hundreds of letters written by the Board of Ordnance to the magazine establishment at Upnor Castle between 1801-4, with others from various sources. The letters refer to the supply of gunpowder and its nature, the storage of powder, its retrieval from ships returning from service and the changing nature […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Weapons

Note: John Laird’s American River Boats

By Paul Quinn

The background to the use of iron river boats is explored, and their early use in America is explained together with the irony that this American experience helped to establish the British industry. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Avoiding the U-Boats: the Clyde-Forth Oil Pipeline

By Warwick M. Brown

With the growth of the German Navy at the start of the twentieth century posing a new threat to British naval supremacy, geographic realities dictated that the North Sea would be the main scene of naval operations in the event of an Anglo-German conflict. However all the existing home bases were located on the South […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Internal Waterways | Other (location)
Subjects include: Logistics

The Longevity of Wooden Warships: the Great Lakes Example

By Robert Malcomson

Late in the 18th century the lives of such ships was short, in all probability owing to the use of unseasoned timber in their construction and to poor laying up practices during the severe winters. Oak, pine and cedar were the preferred timbers used. Efforts to season timber such as by salting, application of paint, […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Early Watercraft Built of Metal, 1777-1838

By Charles Dawson

A listing of the early use of metal in the construction of watercraft on the Clyde, Merseyside and Thames Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Science & Exploration

Note: PS Orwell, 1813-4

By Charlee Dawson

The early steamship PS Orwell was used on the Orwell between Harwich and Ipswich. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Merchant Marines

Note: The Stirling: Pehaps the Earliest Steamer Built on the East Coast of Scotland

By J Colin Bain

This Note uses evidence from the East coast of Scotland to show that the innovation of steam was taken seriously from early in the nineteenth century. Evidence from contemporary newspapers shows how well steam vessels were able to deal with tides in the Forth between Stirling and Leith, or in the Tay. The final voyage […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Science & Exploration | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: The Stirling Perhaps the Earliest Steamer built on the East Coast of Scotland

By J. Colin Bain

The steam-powered Stirling is confirmed as being the first vessel registered in 1814, and her career carrying passengers in the tidal waters of the Forth and thence to the Caledonian Canal is described. The accident which brought her to an end is detailed. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: SS THETIS, 1857, A Daring Experiment

By Charles Dawson

Early steam navigation was restricted to river, coastal and short sea passages. Many improvements were required before ocean travel became viable for steamships, due to the low efficiency of their engines. The iron-screw steamship Thetis, built on the River Clyde in 1857, represented a daring stage in the process of engine improvement. Her compound engine […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Woolwich Steamyard

By Dr Philip MacDougall

This article traces the origins of use of steam power by the Admiralty. Vessels such as Comet were first used to attend to the wants of the fleet, and the need to service these craft at either Woolwich or Deptford was soon realised, despite the shallow water of the Thames. Construction of the new steamyard […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Harbours & Dockyards | Shipbuilding & Design

Filter By Subject

Reset