Archive Results For: Internal Waterways

A Romano-British Boat from the Shores of the Severn Estuary

By Seán McGrail & Owain Roberts

Found in 1993, the Barland’s Farm boat was dated to the the late third century AD. The article describes the distinctive features of this boat, all characteristic of the Romano-Celtic tradition. A model was used to establish the dimensions of the original, and her means of propulsion, steering and mooring was established. There is discussion […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Internal Waterways | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: HMS Ruby and the Poachers

By David Kent

The successful use of a gunboat against poachers in the Tweed River is described. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Whaling & Fishing

Seventeenth-Century Ships’ Timbers and Docks on the Thames Waterfront at Bellamy’s Wharf, Rotherhithe, London SE 16

By David Saxby AIFA and Damian Goodburn BA, AIFA

In early 1995 an archaeological dig was undertaken at Bellamy’s Wharf, Southwark, London prior to building work. The area was known to have hosted a number of shipbuilding activities during the Dutch and Nine Years’ Wars of the later seventeenth-century. The Gould’s Dockyard artefacts contained a number of large worked timbers, including stem and rudder […] Read More

Filed under: Dutch Wars | Nine Years' War | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Archaeology | Harbours & Dockyards

The Trent Ketch

By Brian Widdowson

Based on Maritime Census returns for 1861 and also the Trent Navigation Company’s gauging tables, which indicate the size and capacity of the vessels, it is demonstrated that for most of the nineteenth century Trent ketches were capable of working the full length of the Trent from Nottingham and Loughborough down to the Humber estuary […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Shipbuilding & Design

H.M.S. St Lawrence: the Freshwater First-Rate

By Robert Malcolmson

Towards the end of the War of 1812 American naval forces were performing well on the Great Lakes and the Provincial (Canadian) Marine was strengthened by Royal Naval forces. A shipbuilding programme included HMS St Lawrence, the Royal Navy’s only first rate to operate solely on freshwater. The ship, as large as the Victory although […] Read More

Filed under: War of 1812 | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Naval Ship Launches as Public Spectacle 1773 to 1854

By Margarette Lincoln

The reasons for a launch rather than a floating out of a large naval vessel is explained, together with the social benefits of sharing the excitement and ceremonial aspects of the event. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

Wooden Floating Docks in the Port of Quebec from 1827 until the 1930s

By Eileen Reid Marcil

The expanding timber export trade, stimulated initially in 1806 by Napoleon’s blockade of the Baltic, saw a huge increase in ocean-going shipping visiting the port of Quebec. This gave rise to a demand for ship-salvaging and repairing facilities and led to the establishment by 1825 of 16 shipyards, none of which had dry-docks. In 1826 […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Archaeology | Harbours & Dockyards | Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: The Rig of the Norfolk Wherry

By Robert Malster

This corrects a statement made in an earlier MM about the rig of the Norfolk wherry. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Medieval Fenland Stone Barges; a Fragment of Evidence

By HJK Jenkins

Stone quarried in Northamtonshire was distributed by barge, with a cargo carying capacity of about 8 tonnes. The evidence of seven blocks (totalling about 7 tonnes) found in Whitelesey Mere confirms that the barge carrying them was capable of carrying that amount. Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Fenland Lighters and their Heyday c.1700-1850

By H.J.K. Jenkins

In the 17th Century systematic drainage of the Fenland freed large areas for agricultural development. To export products to the harbours of The Wash, the rivers Nene and Ouse together with their drainage canals were developed for the transport of goods by barge outwards, and for the import of coal, salt, hardware and wines as […] Read More

Filed under: Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Merchant Marines

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