Archive Results For: Mediterranean

Note: A Close Examination of an Ancient Naval Artefact

By Aldo Antonicelli

An identification of an ancient bronze artefact as a secondary ram. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Weapons

From galleys to square riggers: The modernization of the navy of the Kingdom of Sardinia

By Aldo Antonicello

By the middle of the eighteenth century most navies operating in the Mediterranean had replaced their galley fleets with sailing navies. The Kingdom of Sardinia was one of the last to make the transition, acquiring its first square rigged ships in 1763. The galleys were decommissioned and a completely new naval administration was created. The […] Read More

Filed under: Mediterranean | Other (Eighteenth C)
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Manpower & Life at Sea | Merchant Marines | Navies | Strategy & Diplomacy

Caesar’s crossing of the Adriatic Countered by a Winter Blockade During the Roman Civil War

By Ian Longhurst

During the Roman Civil War that broke out in 49 bc between Julius Caesar and Pompey naval operations played a critical role. In order to confront Pompey’s army quickly in the Balkans, a major amphibious crossing of the Adriatic was undertaken by Caesar’s army. The text of Caesar’s Civil War and other sources, including Lucan’s […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Battles & Tactics | Navies

Document: ‘A Distinct Point in Modern Naval Tactics’

By Simon Harley

These are claimed to be the first written orders for a squadron going into battle, taking every eventuality into account. Read More

Filed under: Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics

Paddle Wheels for Sailing Men-of-War

By Joseph Eliav

In 1720 Monsieur du Quest, a French engineer, presented to the Royal Society a paper titled ‘A Method for Rowing Men of War in a Calm’ in which he proposed to install man-operated paddle wheels on British sailing ships. The paper documented sea trials he had performed in 1693 with his invention installed on a […] Read More

Filed under: Mediterranean | Other (Eighteenth C)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Tyrrhenian Naval Iconography During the First Ice Age: the origin of Etruscan ships

By Francesco Tiboni

Starting from a critical analysis of some of the most important evidence concerning Etruscan maritime activities, the evolutionary line linking the ninth-century BC Villanovan clay models to the sixth-century BC figures of Etruscan ships is re-evaluated. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Art & Music | Ship Models & Figureheads

Agincourt Sound Revisited

By Michael Barritt

At the resumption of hostilities in 1803 after the Peace of Amiens, Vice-Admiral Lord Nelson, now commander-in-chief in the Mediterranean, renewed his interest in Sardinia as a logistical base for the blockade of Toulon. The story of the selection of an anchorage, known in the British fleet as Agincourt Sound, situated in the Maddalena Islands […] Read More

Filed under: Nelson | Napoleonic War | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Navies | Science & Exploration

Lord Nelson and Earl St Vincent: Prize Fighters

By Grahame Aldous QC

The lengthy prize litigation over the proceeds of Spanish treasure conducted between 1801 and 1803 involving Lord Nelson and Earl St Vincent is often referred to, but little understood. Using contemporaneous records, correspondence and law reports, this article considers the original prize captures that gave rise to the dispute, the tactics adopted by the litigating […] Read More

Filed under: Nelson | Atlantic | Napoleonic War | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Administration | Navies

The Voyage of Leucippe and Clitophon: a New Interpretation

By Deborah Cvikel, Yaacov Kahanov, Baruch Rosen, Hadas Saaroni & Ehud Galili

As told in a novel of the second century ad, the couple Leucippe and Clitophon boarded a ship sailing from Beirut to Alexandria. The ship, apparently a 20-metre-long coaster, set out on a SW course, driven by an easterly wind. On the third day the wind shifted abruptly to the south-west, and the sea rose. […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Art & Music | Science & Exploration

Between Shoal and Wall: the Naval Bombardment of Akko, 1840

By Yaacov Kahanov, Eliezer Stern, Deborah Cvikel & Yoav Me-Bar

HMS Pique bombarded Akko during the attack by a British–Austrian–Ottoman fleet on the Egyptian-held town on 3 November 1840. Three of her cannonballs were discovered during renovation of the El-Shazliya Mosque in Old Akko, embedded in an inner eastern wall facing the sea. Reduced scale experiments simulating the firing of cannonballs at this wall were conducted by […] Read More

Filed under: Mediterranean | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Weapons

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