Archive Results For: Antiquity

The Ship of St. Paul’s Last Voyage

By Jules Sottas

In 60CE, according to Luke’s Gospel, St. Paul was aboard an Alexandrian barley ship with 276 other people, bound for Rome. An easterly gale drove the ship onto a shoal at Melita where she broke up. The author, curious about the ship, has built a model of a typical first century Alexandrian merchantman, in the […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Art & Music | Merchant Marines | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Ship Models & Figureheads | Shipbuilding & Design

The Evolution of Shipping

By H. H. Brindley

Brindley challenges the statement in Mr. Sheppard’s June 1921 MM article that “the evolution of shipping is very simple”. Sheppard bases his proposition on a Hull Museum of Shipping and Fisheries exhibition of coins, tokens and medals. Brindley contests the idea that evolution was continuous from pre-history to the present day by providing examples of […] Read More

Filed under: Prehistory | Antiquity | Medieval | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Navies

The Transporting of the Obelisks at Karnak Part II

By Admiral G.A. Ballard

Admiral Ballard continues his consideration of the methods that the ancient Egyptians must have used to move the obelisks at Karnak 140 miles along the Nile. The large vessel, the size of HMS Victory as previously described, had four large balanced rudders, like enormous paddles weighing four or five tons each, were slung in pairs […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Transporting of the Obelisks at Karnak Part I

By Admiral G.A. Ballard

Among the ruins of Karnak stand 3 great granite obelisks, quarried 140 miles away16 centuries BC. Their conveyance along the Nile was the greatest operation in the way of handling heavy weights afloat ever carried out before the 19th century. Here Admiral Ballard considers the available evidence from inscriptions and conjectures as to the vessel […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Archaeology | Art & Music | Logistics | Miscellaneous

The Sculptures of Deir-El-Bahari Part III

By Admiral G.A. Ballard

A continuation of Admiral Ballard’s consideration of the evidence of Egyptian naval architecture to be found in the Valley of the Nile, and what it tells us about the seafarers of ancient Egypt. It is universally accepted that some vessel or vessels made the voyage to Punt on Queen Hatshepset’s account. Inscription evidence records a […] Read More

Filed under: Prehistory | Antiquity | Indian Ocean | Internal Waterways | Other (location)
Subjects include: Archaeology | Art & Music | Science & Exploration

The Sculpture of Deir-el-Bahari Part II

By Admiral G.A. Ballard

This continues Admiral Ballard’s analysis of the evidence of Egyptian naval architecture to be found in the Valley of the Nile. The Egyptians wrote up their history on granite and limestone, but what does it tell us and is the text supported by the evidence of the carved representations of Egyptian vessels? The sculptures of […] Read More

Filed under: Prehistory | Antiquity | Indian Ocean | Internal Waterways | Other (location)
Subjects include: Harbours & Dockyards | Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

The Sculpture of Deir-el-Bahari Part I

By G.A. Ballard

The earliest works of art now known to exist which specifically claim to represent vessels that have made a sea voyage, that is to say, the sculptures in the ruined temple of Deir-el-Bahari with their accompanying inscriptions all dating from about 1550 B.C. They certainly do represent in each case a squadron of five fair-sized […] Read More

Filed under: Prehistory | Antiquity | Indian Ocean | Internal Waterways | Other (location)
Subjects include: Harbours & Dockyards | Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

Naval Museums Part III: France Part 1

By Dr. Jules Sottas

Up to now the Musee naval du Louvre had been under the Ministry of Marine. Suddenly, in 1848, it was handed over to the Fine Arts. Still the Ministry of Marine did not drop its interest in the museum it went on with its presentations, and it is to its kindness the museum owes its […] Read More

Filed under: Early Middle Ages | Antiquity | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Archaeology | Harbours & Dockyards | Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Navies | Ship Models & Figureheads | Shipbuilding & Design | Weapons

The Classification of Ancient Galleys

By R C Anderson

The arrangements of rowers and oars has been a matter of controversy for some time. The author proposes a scheme for classifying galleys based on the number of rowers per set of oars This differs from other schemes based on numbers of banks or numbers of rowers per oar. The proposed classification is illustrated by […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Early Ships and Early London

By Douglas Owen

Owen questions Sir Laurence Gomme’s assertion in his book “The Making of London” that the ‘Thames made London’. Owen’s opinion is that the Thames as an export port was a late development and the city sprung up where it did because it was the point where a number of trade tracks converged at the first […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Logistics

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