Archive Results For: Antiquity

Note: The Probable Sailing Capabilities of Middle Minoan Aegean Ships

By Edward Gifford and Joyce Gifford

Analysis of Minoan seals, together with illustrations from the Thera Frescos, suggests that Minoan vessels of the mid-second millennium BC had fine-lined shallow vee-shaped hulls and could be propelled by oars and sails. It is further suggested that the square sail was boom-footed and could be cocked up to behave as a balanced dipping lug […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: The Probable Sailing Capabilities of Middle Minoan Aegean Ships

By Edward Gifford and Joyce Gifford

Analysis of Minoan seals, together with illustrations from the Thera Frescos, suggests that Minoan vessels of the mid-second millennium BC had fine-lined shallow vee-shaped hulls and could be propelled by oars and sails. It is further suggested that the square sail was boom-footed and could be cocked up to behave as a balanced dipping lug […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

NOTE: Some Proposed Compromises on Triremes

By Alec Tilley

This note proposes several compromises which would allow some of the evidence concerning ancient warships to be accepted and scientific methods adopted. Such compromises are necessary in the number of oarsmen, their organisation and seating arrangements. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: The Marsala Punic ship: an Obituary

By Honor Frost

The sad story of the abandonment of any pretence at saving this unique wreck is outlined by Honor Frost who was instrumental in the establishment of its value. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology

Note: The Probable Sailing Capabilities of Middle Minoan Aegean ships

By Edward and Joyce Gifford

Extensive work on evidence from many sources and the reconstruction of sailing characteristics of late Bronze Age sailing craft has resulted in confirmation that such vessels could make reliable direct passages contrary to the prevailing winds. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

The Origins of the Ancient Methods of Designing Hulls: A Hypothesis Part II

By Sergio Bellabarba

A follow-on to the author’s article in the Mariner’s Mirror August 1993, this suggests a letter to Charles I of Anjou (King of Sicily) in 1275 confirms the existence of well-established methods of galley construction, survived from ancient times and possibly a carry-over from the crusade of 1204, and yet evolving from ‘shell-first’ to (load-bearing) […] Read More

Filed under: Early Middle Ages | Late Middle Ages | Antiquity | High Middle Ages | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Reconstructing the Past: the Operation of the Trireme Reconstruction Olympias in the Light of the Historical Sources

By Boris Rankov

  This paper is a summary of lessons drawn from practical experience of crewing Olympias, a reconstructed 4th century BCE Greek trireme. Over a series of summers volunteer rowers participated in a project to understand the workings of such a vessel and which also permitted analysis of the practical difficulties that arose. Highlighted in this […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Manpower & Life at Sea

The Origins of the Ancient Methods of Designing Hulls Part I

By Sergio Bellabarba

Through the study of medieval age’s plans, the shipbuilding evolution in Venice and Mediterranean Sea is analysed. A set of simple rules with numerical instructions as curves, radius and arcs of a circle to determine the shape of the hulls is used in the shipyards until the evolution to a more recent method of drawings. Read More

Filed under: Early Middle Ages | Late Middle Ages | Antiquity | High Middle Ages | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Sea Trials of the Reconstructed Athenian Trireme Olympias: a Reply to Lucien Basch

By John Coates and John Morrison

The design of galleys in antiquity has long been of interest. Some details in a book by the authors published in 1986 were challenged in a review by Lucien Basch in 1987; so the authors reconstructed a trireme for sea trials between 1987 and 1992, named Olympias and commissioned into the Hellenic Navy. These trials […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Stone Anchors: the Evidence Re-assessed

By Alessandra Nibbi

A number of stone anchors or mooring stones had been raised from the sea bottom, others were found on land, and a few more were graphically represented. Most of them came from the Mediterranean, with the oldest one dated earlier than 2345 B.C., but there were a few more from outside that area. The paper […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology

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