Archive Results For: Antiquity

Note: The Punic warship is re-erected in Marsala

By Honor Frost

The triumphant restoration of the Punic warship in its new resting place in Marsala Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration

The First Triremes

By J. S. Morrison

The date and place of the invention of the trireme have been the subject of dispute among historians. This article supports the view that the account of Thucydides, placing the first triremes at Corinth at the end of the eighth or middle of the seventh centuries BC, is believable when all of the other evidence […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Metal Sheathing of Roman Warships

By Lucien Basch

An earlier article by L. Casson (MM 64, 139-142) concluded that while Roman fishing boats were sheathed, warships were not. The reason given was that fishing boats spent longer periods in the water than warships. In this article the author presents iconographic evidence from portraits of ships on mosaic tiles at the baths at Thermetra […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Rowing the Trireme

By J.S. Morrison

In their paper “Greek Oared Ships 900-322BC” R.T. Williams and J.S. Morrison collected, as far as possible, all the relevant evidence related to the oar systems of these ships. They deduced the maximum dimensions of the ship sheds, the number of men in the ships company of trieres and the length and number of oars […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

More Evidence for Lead Sheathing on Roman Craft

By Lionel Casson

This short paper is followed by a longer reply and also a postscript discussing the validity of the original author’s assumptions. The references are to the literary and iconographic evidence which purports to prove that a number of Roman vessels, both naval and merchant, used lead sheathing on their hulls.  The ‘evidence’ put forward in […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

Le Navire Mnš et Autres Notes de Voyage en Egypte

By Lucien Basch

Under Ramses II and III (c.1200 BC) the Egyptians used a type of merchant ship called a mnš which, although built in their own shipyards, appear to have been of Syrian design.  Ship graffiti and stone anchors found at Karnak point to a greater complexity in the design development of these vessels but unfortunately they […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

An Attempted Reconstruction of the Marsala Punic Ship

By Paul Adam

The article essays an attempt at calculating the hull shape of the 235BC Marsala ship.  To avoid excessive manual calculations, not all the archaeological material was used.   The starting point was the broadening of the hull planks as they run forward, significantly less so than on Viking ships. This makes the stern rise more slowly. […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

Rowing the Trireme: A Practical Experiment in Seamanship

By A. F. Tilley

The traditional view of a trireme has been that it had triple-banked oars on each side, with six oarsmen in cross section, three on each side. This article challenges that assumption as a misinterpretation of the available evidence and contends that a trireme had three oarsmen in cross-section. The suggested arrangement is a central, lower, […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology

Cable Reinforcement of the Athenian Trireme

By Don H. Kennedy

This is a technical article which discusses the rationale behind the hypozomata (heavy cables) that are on record as being supplied as hull reinforcement for Athenian triremes. It establishes that they contributed much more to their hull strength and service life than it was previously thought, and postulates how they would have been fitted and […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Ancient Maritime Law

By G. Chowdharay-Best

Neither the ancient Greeks nor the Romans had a formal concept of international law of the sea, in part because the modern concept of coequal nations did not itself yet exist. However, the maritime laws of both eras were similar in some respects their modern equivalents. For example, the proxenus system of the Greek states […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers

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