Archive Results For: Antiquity

The Thera Ship

By Thomas C Gillmer

This article describes the nautical details of a miniature fragment of a fresco depicting Bronze Age Aegean ships at sea, discovered by Professor Spyridon Marinatos at the excavations at Thera, which may be the first such artworks found of the Aegeans, and perhaps the earliest of any ancient Western ship.  Analysis of their design and […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

De la Survivance de Traditions Navales Phéniciennes dans la Méditerranée de Nos Jours – ou des Reves a la Réalité (On the Survival of Phoenician Naval Traditions in the Mediterranean of our Days – or on Dreams to Reality)

By Lucien Basch

This article, written in French by a distinguished Belgian nautical archaeologist and historian, is a scathing critique of a number of articles by Lieutenant-Commander A.F. Tilley, in The Mariners Mirror and elsewhere, claiming to discover traces of Phoenician influence on the design of a number of traditional Mediterranean boats.   Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C)
Subjects include: Archaeology | Leisure & Small Craft

Discovery of a Punic Ram: Four Campaigns of Excavation

By Honor Frost

A brief report is presented on the discovery in 1974 of the prow of a Carthaginian warship on the sea floor north of Marsala, Sicily. The discovery complements the stern of the ‘Punic Ship’ found in 1971, and it not only fills a gap in our knowledge of Phoenicio-Punic ship architecture but also clarifies the […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Weapons

The Survival of Ancient Mediterranean Boat Designs

By A. F. Tilley

The sea-going Phoenicians colonised the Mediterranean and Portuguese shores.  From ancient carvings of their boats, it is perhaps possible to recognise modern survivors of those designs. Common characteristics, irrespective of size, are double-ended carvel-built hulls, with conspicuous bow and stern, tilt or turtle canopies, and similar oarage.  Examination of construction, related myths and linguistic characteristics […] Read More

Filed under: Early Middle Ages | Atlantic | Late Middle Ages | Antiquity | High Middle Ages | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C) | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Archaeology | Leisure & Small Craft | Merchant Marines | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: An Ancient Roman ‘Yacht’ from a Dispersed Cargo

By Honor Frost

The author, an experienced diver, explains that excavation and cataloguing should precede deduction about ancient wrecks. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology

Rowing in the Ancient Mediterranean: a New Aspect

By A. F. Tilley and V. H. Fenwick

A strong case is presented dealing with the method of rowing in reverse, stern first, based on ancient pictorial and written evidence.  The method used by the ancient oarsmen to reverse direction is fully described in detail.  The accuracy of painted pottery in relation to ancient oared ships is also technically vindicated. Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

An Ancient Roman Yacht

By Conte Piero Gargallo di Castel Lentini

Investigation of a wreck south of Sicily suggests that it could have been used by a prominent individual in Roman times as a yacht. The wreck had been discovered a dozen or more years earlier than this recent investigation and had been either disturbed by fishermen or plundered by illegal hunters. However, remains of mosaics, […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology

Phoenician Oared Ships Part II

By Lucien Basch

In the second part of his study about the origin of the ancient trieres, Basch presents evidence concerning rigging, hull decoration and iconography, testifying that the very first appearance of the ancient trieres must be attributed to Phoenician culture. Further, he deeply analyzes the evolution of this boat-type, suggesting some interesting technical parallels between Phoenician […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

Phoenician Oared Ships Part I

By Lucien Basch

Greek trieres have been well documented but little is known of those of other states of antiquity. Here Basch argues that Phoenician galleys evolved differently from those of Greece. Five points differentiate the Phoenician vessel: protective shields along its sides; an upper deck; a widened hull with ‘encorbellements’; an absence of wales and the shape […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Super-Galleys of the Helenistic Age

By Lionel Casson

The construction and operation of the trireme of the Mediterranean navies of antiquity is now well-documented, but what of the larger vessels? It is believed that the number of rowers increased from one to as many as six per oar but this does not explain the layout of galleys known as ‘twenties’ etc. Clues within […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Navies | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

Filter By Subject

Administration
Archaeology
Art & Music
Battles & Tactics
Harbours & Dockyards
Historic Vessels
Museums & Restoration
Leisure & Small Craft
Logistics
Manpower & Life at Sea
Merchant Marines
Miscellaneous
Navies
Ocean Liners & Passenger Craft
Pirates
Corsairs & Privateers
Science & Exploration
Science & Exploration
Ship Handling & Seamanship
Ship Models & Figureheads
Shipbuilding & Design
Strategy & Diplomacy
Weapons
Whaling & Fishing
Reset