Archive Results For: Tudors

A Battle Ship of the Renaissance

By Geoffrey Callender

The article discusses an image of a ship carved in a bench-end in the church of Bishop’s Lydeard in Somerset. The author advances his arguments for considering the ship to be a vessel from the reign of Henry V11. Based on this, the author highlights various features of the picture that show how it embodies […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Lord Admiral’s Whistle

By Julian S. Corbett

  The article provides a discussion of the evidence supporting the contention that a golden whistle represented a badge of the office of Lord Admiral. The author summarises what his research has revealed about the uses and owners of such whistles. It is suggested that any practical use, if any, may have become largely obsolete […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | English Channel
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration

Document: Seamen’s Clothes Part III

By by courtesy of W.G. Perrin

The proposal that ships should carry clothes for distribution is countered by evidence that it did not seem to have materialised. Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Other (location)
Subjects include: Administration | Manpower & Life at Sea

The Ark Royal

By R. Morton Nance

A comparison of the painted panel, formerly in Canterbury Cathedral, with the Ark Royal print, shows that the rig of these two ships is practically the same, the only important difference lying in the fact that in the Ark Royal the furled spritsail is lowered into the beak, while it remains standing out on the […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

Document: Disabled Mariners after the Armada

By courtesy of C. Howard

The letter signed by Charles, Lord Howard in August 1590 requests that all those in authority within the realm provide alms to or allow to beg, William Browne, a gunner in one of His Majesty’s ships, who was severely wounded in the war with Spain and as a result was permanently maimed. Read More

Filed under: Tudors | The Armada | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies

Wyngaerde’s Map of London

By Geoffrey Callender

The earliest map of London that has come down to our time is Wyngaerde’s panorama, dating from between 1543 and 1550. It provides a bird’s-eye view of the whole city, together with Westminster and Southwark, from above Southwark High Street. In addition to the many buildings shown are a large number of sailing vessels. More […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Art & Music

Note: Dictionary Words

By E du Boulay

Du Boulay provides a number of nautical words taken from a “Collection of Voyages and Travels”, which was published in 1745. The words had been used by Sir Francis Drake in his diary of his voyage to the Pacific in 1577 and from the records of the first Dutch vessels to sail to the East […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Francis Drake | Indian Ocean | Pacific
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Note: Top Men

By R Morton Nance

From contemporary sources Morton Nance seeks to explain how the size of Tudor trading vessels could be differentiated by the use of the term ‘topmen’. These were ships of between 40 and 100 tons burthen and carried a topsail above the main sail. At St Ives this additional sail carried a financial penalty when loading […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Dictionary Words

By E du Boulay

Du Boulay provides a number of nautical words taken from a “Collection of Voyages and Travels”, which was published in 1745. The words had been used by Sir Francis Drake in his diary of his voyage to the Pacific in 1577 and from the records of the first Dutch vessels to sail to the East […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Pacific
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Note: Top Men

By R Morton Nance

From contemporary sources Morton Nance seeks to explain how the size of Tudor trading vessels could be differentiated by the use of the term ‘topmen’. These were ships of between 40 and 100 tons burthen and carried a topsail above the main sail. At St Ives this additional sail carried a financial penalty when loading […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

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