Archive Results For: Seven Years’ War

Note: The Galliot Hoy Youfro Maria

By N.A.M. Rodger

At the outset of the Seven Years’ War the navy was concerned by the use of neutral vessels to transport military goods, and this description of a small merchantman is of particular interest because of her cargo of powder, lead and timber. Read More

Filed under: Seven Years’ War | North Sea
Subjects include: Merchant Marines

The British Raid on Rochefort, 1757

By W. Kent Hackmann

The Seven Years’ War (1756-1757) had begun badly for the British with a series of defeats, miscarried plans, reversal of alliances and an invasion scare. There was lack of military success in America in 1757 and the war in Europe was going badly. To rectify the situation England needed to deliver a short, sharp, offensive […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Seven Years’ War
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Biography

The Cost of Impressment During the Seven Years War

By Larry Neal

During the Seven Years War (1756–1763), as in the wars before and after, the Government had the problem of manning the Royal Navy in times of war without handicapping the merchant marine upon which the nation’s wealth, and ultimately its survival, depended. Larry Neal uses contemporary statistics and collates them against some of the proposals […] Read More

Filed under: Seven Years’ War | Press Gangs | Other (location)
Subjects include: Administration | Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

The Origins of the 74-Gun Ship

By Brian Lavery

From 1745 – 1822 the two deck 74 was the backbone of the Royal Navy, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars, because of its balance of firepower, sailing qualities and cost. With the development of diagonal bracing in 1811, which minimized hogging, larger ships carrying greater firepower became practical and dominated the early Victorian Navy. Design […] Read More

Filed under: Napoleonic War | Seven Years’ War
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

The Frigate Designs of 1755–57

By Robert Gardiner

In the 1750s, the Admiralty established a sound policy; parallel evaluation of designs based on proven models.  Frigates formed four independent classes with differing hull shapes, tillers, hawse holes, load-ports and pumps.   Firstly, the 28 gun class, based on a French privateer, included Lowestoffe with beakhead and Tartar with rounded bow.   Secondly,  the well-known Southampton, […] Read More

Filed under: Seven Years’ War
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

The Methodology of British Amphibious Operations During the Seven Years’ and American Wars

By David Syrett

Transporting, deploying, and supporting armed forces by sea required sophisticated organization and logistics. After a failure at Rochefort in 1757, the British learned to specify the joint and separate responsibilities of commanders of the navy and army and their subordinate officers. Troops and their prepared weapons were landed under the command of naval officers, after […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Seven Years’ War | American Revolution | Caribbean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Logistics | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design | Weapons

Mr Batson’s Yard

By Helen Simms

A short history of the Batson yard including property developments in Isle of Dogs. Includes a list of ships build for the navy by them between 1755 – 1787. (NB possible misprint in price for Guardian of 1784). Read More

Filed under: Seven Years’ War | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Admiralty and the Convoy System in the Seven Years War

By R P Crowhurst

In general, the costs of war require funding from higher forms of taxation than the normal internal economic sources. Merchants and banks, together with their credit ratings, become a prime source of Government revenue.   With the prevalence of privateering in this period, the protection of trade was paramount and a specific programme of escorted convoys […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | English Channel | Seven Years’ War
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers

Th British Landing at Havana: An Example of an Eighteenth-century Combined Operation

By David Syrett

The success of this amphibious operation was the result of careful planning, the provision of hundreds of support vessels, and rigorous division of labour between the navy which landed the troops and the army which then carried out the plans. On 7 June 1762 1,800 rank-and-file men, with units of artillery and engineers, were landed […] Read More

Filed under: Seven Years’ War | Caribbean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Logistics | Strategy & Diplomacy

The Capture of Havana 1762

By Nicholas Tracy

The article explains the political background to this attack, and the personalities and abilities of the commanders of the British forces. The plan of attack on Manila, drawn up by General Draper, depended for success on surprise and harmony between the army and the navy. The Spanish were completely surprised, and the Spanish could do […] Read More

Filed under: Seven Years’ War | Pacific
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Logistics | Strategy & Diplomacy

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