Archive Results For: American Civil War

The First Blockade Runner and ‘Another Alabama’. Some Tees and Hartlepool Ships that Worried the Union

By Peter Barton

A great deal has been written about the British blockade runners during the American Civil War. Much of this has focussed on the contribution of Liverpool and the west coast. This article presents short histories of seventeen ships, built or owned by north-east coast merchants, which were involved, implicated in,  or intended for, blockade running. […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

The Engagement between the C.S.S. Alabama and the U.S.S. Kearsarge 19 May 1864: the Archaeological Discovery 1984-88

By Max Guerout

An account of the discovery of the wreck of the C.S.S. Alabama off Cherbourg by a French Navy team using modern Circe class minehunters during the 1980s. Guerout, who participated in the search, deals with the challenges of locating the wreck, using Stenuit’s work based on the log of the Kearsarge as a starting point. […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Archaeology

Note: Legends about Wreckers

By Henning Henningsen

An account of the international spread of legends about the deliberate wrecking of ships. Read More

Filed under: American Civil War | Other (Eighteenth C) | Shipwrecks | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Yankee Ironclads at Birkenhead? A note on Gideon Welles, John Laird and Gustavus V. Fox

By John David Smith

Diplomatic row about John Laird & Sons supplying powerful commerce raiders such as the C.S.S. Alabama to the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. At its centre was the thin interpretation of the 1819 Foreign Enlistment Act and British Neutrality in foreign wars. Because Lairds ships were fitted outside British territorial waters they claimed […] Read More

Filed under: American Civil War | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Strategy & Diplomacy

The Confederate State Navy, 1861-1865: The Irish Contribution

By J. de Courcy Ireland

The existence of the Confederate State Navy was nearly a miracle, because at the outbreak of the war against the Union, the South didn’t have any ship of war and the numbers of merchant vessels were very scarce. This defect was remedied by a lot of improvisation, so at the end of the conflict the […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War | Caribbean
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Navies

Construction and Purchase of Confederate Cruisers in Great Britain During the American Civil War

By Richard I. Lester

The Confederacy successfully built or purchased five commerce raiders in neutral Britain, despite Union opposition.  In 1862, the barque Florida was built in Liverpool, armed in Nassau, and later captured thirty-four ships.   The twin-engined barque, Alabama, was built in Birkenhead, armed in the Azores and sank seventy ships.  The iron steamer Georgia was purchased in […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War
Subjects include: Navies | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers | Strategy & Diplomacy | Weapons

The Procurement of Confederate Blockade Runners and Other Vessels in Great Britain During the American Civil War

By Richard I. Lester

The Confederates entered the American Civil War blockaded by the North and numerically inferior to it in ships and shipyards. They sought to redress the deficiency by procuring from Britain, through building and purchase, warships and fast vessels equipped to run the blockade, in order to export cotton to England and return with urgently needed […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War | Caribbean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Logistics | Shipbuilding & Design | Strategy & Diplomacy

The Rise and Fall of the Monitor 1862-1973

By Richard H. Thompson

The monitor displayed a process of evolution from Ericsson’s original concept through the big British monitors of the World Wars to the Zippos of Vietnam. Because it was capable of development, the monitor was important in the evolution of the battleship and other surface combat types. The monitor meantime, continues to have an independent existence […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | WW1 | Baltic | English Channel | WW2 | North Sea | Crimean War | Post WW2 | American Civil War | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design | Weapons

Law and the Florida

By Victor F.L. Millard

The law of the seas deals, among other things, with the cases of seizing or sinking enemy ships in war. As it is sometimes difficult to decide on the spot whether a seizure or a sinking was within the limits of the law if it affected a neutral ship or neutral cargo, claims may be […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers

Mersey-Built Blockade-Runners of the American Civil War

By Arthur C Wardle M.I. Ex.

British blockade-runners played an important role in the fortunes of the Southern States during the American Civil War and influenced the development of steamship design and speed. A large number of such vessels, mainly fast steel-hulled paddle steamers, were purpose-built in Mersey shipyards. They included the ‘Banshee’, the first steel vessel to make the Atlantic […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | American Civil War | Irish Sea
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

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