Archive Results For: Other (Twentieth C)

Note: Captain Boteler

By G. Greenhill

Greenhill recalls a meeting with a more recent Captain Boteler than the one discussed in MM Volume 1, Issues 1 and 3. This particular Boteler privately published his memories of life in the Royal Navy but prior to general circulation it was pulled by his family due to a bad review and all the copies […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography | Navies

Note: Peter Boat

By L G Carr Laughton

Carr Laughton describes in detail what he believed to be the last remaining Peter Boat on the Thames. At twenty-three feet in length and nine feet wide such vessels were used for fishing, as evidenced by the fish well at its centre. The one he came across in 1911 was still being used for its […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Whaling & Fishing

Note: Old Sea Terms Ashore

By L G Carr Laughton

Carr Laughton raises an interesting point concerning phrases that were common at sea and were adopted ashore. He also points out that some expressions were more common on shore than at sea and that, at sea, words retained a meaning which had gone out of use on the land and vice-versa. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Note: Forgotten Meanings

By Alan H. Moore

Moore discusses the meaning of a number of commonly used terms that originated at sea. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Note: To Sew

By Various

The Note contains a number of responses following an item in MM Volume 1, Issue 1 concerning the phrase ‘to sew’. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

The Boatswain’s Call: as it was and as it should still be, used in HM Navy

By A Lieutenant, RN

This graphically illustrated article explains the importance of the whistle, which was used to pass orders around a ship without shouting. The purpose of each call, the ways in which the call is made, and the different effects achieved are all explained. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: To Sew

By S Goodwin

The verb “to sew”, when referring to a ship, meant ‘to go dry’ but appeared to be obsolete by 1911. Goodwin relates his conversations at that time with a number of seafarers in Kent, with the older ones remembering the phrase but younger men having no recollection of its use. Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Twentieth C)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

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