Archive Results For: WW1

Veteran Warships of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-1905 in World War II

By Richard H. Thompson

A number of naval vessels which were involved in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05 remained in service, particularly in training and auxiliary roles, long enough to participate in the Second World War. This happened because between the world wars in the USSR on the one hand shipbuilding had declined and in Japan on the other […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Interwar | Post WW2 | Other (location)
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Navies

Mediterranean Strategy and Anglo-French Relations 1908-1912

By H. I. Lee

This article details the delicate discussions, one should not use ‘negotiations’, between Britain and her putative and capricious ally, France, during the period leading towards WW1, regarding each countries defence strategy in the event of hostilities being initiated by a third party – most likely from the Third Alliance, between Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy. The […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | English Channel | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C)
Subjects include: Strategy & Diplomacy

The Navy at Cambridge, 1919-1923

By S. W. Roskill, DSC, MA, RN

WW1 interrupted the education of significant numbers of young men who served in the armed forces. At the cessation of hostilities the Royal Navy decided to do something to redress the matter. In early 1919, 400 junior officers commenced a six-month course at Cambridge, followed by some 800 over the next four years. The Admiralty […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Administration | Navies

The Barquentine Raymond and Her Owner-Master

By James Murdoch

Captain James Murdoch’s autobiography describes his life, during the late 1800s – early 1900s, as one of the last of the owner-masters of a square-rigged sailing vessel. He went to sea aboard his father’s brig the Mayfield in 1890, as Boy and subsequently worked his way up to Mate. At the age of 20 he […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | English Channel | North Sea | Irish Sea | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Biography | Merchant Marines | Ship Handling & Seamanship

The Loss of the Victoria

By Commander Hilary Mead, R.N.

In 1959 a book was published on the subject of the loss of the Victoria. Apart from the events of the collision and subsequent court-marshal, the book’s main theme was the contrast in personalities of the two flag-officers. The author went out of his way to whitewash Tryon, and blacken the character of Markham, saying […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | North Sea | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Navies | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: ‘Gallant Gentlemen’

By E. M. Tenison

This Note provides a biographical profile of Admiral Sir Walter Cowan, who had a very colourful career. He joined the Royal Navy in 1884, served in Africa in the 1890s, commanded a battle cruiser at Jutland, commanded the North American station after the war, became A.D.C. to the King in 1930, and retired in 1939, […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | WW2 | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography

Ships of India, 1834 – 1934

By Victor F.L. Millard

This article discusses the vessels of the Indian Navy as the ships of the East India Company were called after 1834. The Company was moving from sail to steam and the specification, construction and service career of several ships are described. Contributions to hostilities in China and the Crimea are recorded. The East India Company’s […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Interwar | Opium Wars | Crimean War | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Indian Ocean | East India Company
Subjects include: Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

The Lighter Crimes of the French Bluejackets

By C.E. Eldred

In the course of the Great War I was brought into close relations with the French Naval Officers. One of these with a sense of humour had kept a record of minor offences against good order and discipline committed by French bluejackets. The cases he selected were amusing, not only for the naïve wording of […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Mutiny & Discipline | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

Craft of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Part III

By Alan Moore

At Yanbo a kind of sambuk is used for fishing. These vessels are lower in the water than those which carry cargo and their sterns are not so high, and their waist cloths of matting are in consequence more prominent in a side view. Their yards are literally ” lash ups,” and the several pieces […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Indian Ocean
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Shipbuilding & Design | Whaling & Fishing

Craft of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Part II

By Alan Moore

The sambuk, or saiyeh (another name for the same craft, meaning swift), is the ordinary Red Sea trader met in every port. Sambuks vary in size. Some carry eighty tons of cargo, many certainly could not take half that amount, some are gaily painted in many colours; others have a simple but striking design, and […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Indian Ocean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

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