Archive Results For: WW2

Book Review-‘Blazing Star, Setting Sun: The Guadalcanal-Solomons campaign, November 1942–March 1943’ by J. R. Cox

By Evan Mawdsley

This thick volume is the third in a series written by Jeffrey R. Cox and published by Osprey. Rising Sun, Falling Skies (2014) covered the role of the US Navy in the calamitous Dutch East Indies campaign of early 1942. Morning Star, Midnight Sun (2018) dealt with the fighting around Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands, […] Read More

Filed under: WW2 | Pacific
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics

Book Review-‘Dunkirk and the Little Ships’ by P. Weir,

By Duncan Conners

The Little Ships of the evacuation of Dunkirk are firmly etched into the common folk lore surrounding the events of the Second World War. Requisitioned by the Royal Navy via the Ministry of Shipping, a series of workboats, fishing boats, small pleasure cruisers and leisure steamers were taken (mostly with the owner’s permission, sometimes without) […] Read More

Filed under: English Channel | WW2
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Leisure & Small Craft

Book Review-‘Taranto and Naval Air Warfare in the Mediterranean, 1940–1945’ by D. Hobbs

By David Bowen

During the Second World War the Mediterranean remained a strategic lifeline between Britain and the Suez Canal, and thence the oil fields of the Middle East and the resources and manpower of the British Empire. Yet in 1940 it presented a formidable obstacle; from the British base at Gibraltar to its base in Malta was […] Read More

Filed under: WW2 | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Naval Aviation

Book Review-‘Warship Builders: An industrial history of naval shipbuilding, 1922–1945’ by T. Heinrich

By Evan Mawdsley

This wide-ranging book straddles a range of topics. It will be useful to informed general readers interested in warships and shipbuilding, as well as to economic historians considering the role of the state in wartime. The title (and subtitle) might have been more specific, as much the largest part of the book is about American […] Read More

Filed under: Interwar | WW2
Subjects include: Navies | Shipbuilding & Design | Weapons

Book Review-‘Churchill’s Admiral in Two World Wars: Admiral of the Fleet Lord Keyes of Zeebrugge and Dover GCB KCVO CMG DSO’ by J. Crossley

By Derek Law

This is the first biography of Roger Keyes for some decades and fills a surprising gap in the literature. Keyes had a hugely successful career and was an archetypal son of the British Empire. Born in India in 1872, where his father was commander of the Punjab Frontier Force, he was one of nine children. […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | Interwar | WW2
Subjects include: Biography

‘One Torpedo, One Ship’: An appraisal of Otto Kretschmer’s U-boat tactics, 1939–1941

By Michele Magnozzi

Otto Kretschmer was the most successful U-boat commander of the Second World War. While his wartime actions have been narrated several times, his tactics, summarized by the famous motto ‘one torpedo, one ship’, have never been systematically analysed. In this work, Kretschmer’s success is appraised through the analysis of the key characteristics of his attacks, […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | WW2
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Submarines

Book Review-‘ The Modern Cruiser: The evolution of the ships that fought the Second World War’ by R. C. Stern,

By Derek G. Law

he first and very positive thing one notices about this book is the sheer quality of the production. Sumptuous is perhaps too strong a description, but there is a good strong dust jacket which will not fray or tear with shelf wear; the pages are of strong durable near- photographic- quality paper, and the images […] Read More

Filed under: WW2 | Post WW2
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Navies | Weapons

Book Review-‘ Silver State Dreadnought: The remarkable story of battleship ‘Nevada’’ by S. M. Younger

By Eric Grove

USS Nevada was one of the first of a new generation of American dreadnoughts. She and her half-sister Oklahoma pioneered ‘all or nothing’ protection and oil burning as designed. She had turbines, but the US Navy was still worried about potential range disadvantages of these power plants and thus made Oklahoma a reciprocating engined vessel, […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | WW2 | Post WW2
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

Book Review-‘British Town Class Cruisers: Design, development and performance, Southampton and Belfast classes’ by C. Waters

By Aidan Dodson

Between 1937 and 1939 the Royal Navy commissioned ten cruisers armed with a dozen 6-inch guns and named after British cities. Originally to be named after mythological beings and dubbed the Minotaur class, they then became the Southampton and ‘Improved Southampton’/Belfast classes but, especially after the loss of the name-ship, have regularly been dubbed the […] Read More

Filed under: WW2 | Post WW2
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Book Review-‘Anatomy of the Ship: The battleship USS ‘Iowa’’ by S. Draminski

By David Bowen

Commissioned in 1943, the United States Ship Iowa was the lead ship of a class of six that were destined to be the very last US battleships; indeed only four of the class were subsequently built. Formidably armed, well armoured and handsome, they were the fastest battleships ever built, with a maximum speed of 33 […] Read More

Filed under: WW2 | Post WW2
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

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