Archive Results For: Popular Topics

The Battle of Jutland, Through a Looking-glass

By Derek Nudd

The German High Seas Fleet’s sorties in strength after the battle of Jutland were few and inconclusive, but as a ‘fleet in being’ it remained a powerful threat. Britain’s Admiralty, alive to the tactical issues thrown up by Jutland’s titanic clash, was anxious to learn what had gone wrong. Luckily for the British, German veterans […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | North Sea | Jutland
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics

The Afterlife of the Ostend Company, 1727–1745

By Gijs Dreijer

The Generale Keijzerlijcke Indische Compagnie, known as the Ostend Company or GIC, was a short-lived but very successful chartered company based in the Southern Netherlands between 1722 and 1727. Despite the high profits from the Chinese tea trade, the Habsburg Emperor Charles VI was forced to retract its charter in 1727 under Dutch and English […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | East India Company
Subjects include: Merchant Marines

Some Adventures of a Seafaring Accountant: William Crickmay and the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, 1853–1858

By Ernest W. Toy

William Crickmay was the purser of five Royal Mail Steam Packet Company ships from 1854 to 1858. These ships provided mail services from Southampton to St Thomas and Rio de Janeiro, and thence to local ports of call. His third ship, the Orinoco, chartered for war service, voyaged to and from Portsmouth to the Crimean war […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Crimean War | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Biography | Manpower & Life at Sea

Note: Echoes of a Distant War

By Colin Jones

An exploration of the naval history of Sydney and New South Wales during the Napoleonic Wars from 1797 to 1814, touching on proposed conscription of convicts to fight in South American possessions, Matthew Flinders’ meeting with Nicolas Baudin, shipbuilding and traffic through Sydney Naval Yard, the operation of press gangs,  privateering and whaling. Read More

Filed under: Napoleonic War | Indian Ocean | Pacific | Press Gangs
Subjects include: Harbours & Dockyards | Navies | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers | Science & Exploration | Whaling & Fishing

How Large Was Mars? An investigation of the dimensions of a legendary Swedish warship, 1563–1564

By Niklas Eriksson

The Swedish warship Mars was considered to have been one of the largest ships in the world when it exploded and sank in 1564. The problem is that no written accounts clearly reveal its dimensions. This article reviews how different researchers have discussed the size of Mars in the past. It also aims to shed new light on this […] Read More

Filed under: Baltic | Other (Early Modern) | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

‘We Almost Gave Ourselves Up for Lost That Night’: Alfred Costello’s account of the shipwreck of the Elizabeth, 1852

By Alison Henry and Richard Henry

The merchant mariner Alfred Costello recorded an account of the shipwreck of the barque Elizabeth on the Andaman Islands in 1852. His account provides an insight into the challenges faced by the crew culminating in a 300-mile journey from the Andaman Islands to Burma (Myanmar). Only Costello and the ship’s captain survived to return to England. Costello’s […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Indian Ocean | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Ship Handling & Seamanship

The Operational Impact of the Loss of HMS Paragon in the Straits of Dover, 17 March 1917

By Eamonn Welch

In early 1917, the torpedo boat destroyer HMS Paragon was part of the Dover Patrol, then subject to repeated raids by German destroyers. Its history is normally consigned to a few, often inaccurate, short sentences, in which it is implied that it had an almost supine role in the action in which it was lost. This article […] Read More

Filed under: WW1 | English Channel | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Navies

‘Your Dutiful Nephew’: Thomas Denman Ledward (1766–1789/90), acting surgeon of the Bounty

By Pieter van der Merwe

The surviving family letters of, and relating to, Thomas Denman Ledward, acting surgeon in HM armed vessel Bounty, have never been fully researched before. They are used here as the basis for constructing his brief biography. It provides a case study of the chances that could launch an eighteenth-century naval medical career (and tragically terminate it), […] Read More

Filed under: Mutiny & Discipline | Eighteenth Century | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Biography | Manpower & Life at Sea

The Battle of Jutland’s Heritage Under Threat: Commercial salvage on the shipwrecks as observed 2000 to 2016

By Innes McCartney

This paper presents the most recent ndings up to August 2016 of the extent to which the shipwrecks from the battle of Jutland have been exposed to salvage for metals. Commercial salvage of the wrecks is not new and archival research has traced salvage activity as far back as 1960. However over the last 15 […] Read More

Filed under: North Sea | Other (Twentieth C) | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Navies

Note: Student Strikebreakers: The 1934 West Coast waterfront strikes and the SS Mariposa

By Douglas Sprague

The West Coast strike by longshoremen which affected all shipping was broken by students from college or university. This is a personal account of the cruise of SS Mariposa, crewed by student strikebreakers. Read More

Filed under: Mutiny & Discipline | Other (Twentieth C) | Pacific
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Merchant Marines

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