Archive Results For: Health at Sea

Diet, Dirt and Discipline: Medical Developments in Nelson’s Navy: Dr John Snipe’s Contribution

By Jane Bowden-Dan

The notorious fighting superiority of Nelson’s ships owed much to the health and discipline of the men. In the second half of the eighteenth century, the medical officers in the British Navy proposed, and obtained, several improvements in general diet, anti-scorbutics, and hygiene. These efforts are recounted mainly on the basis of the reports and […] Read More

Filed under: Nelson | Napoleonic War | French Revolution | Mediterranean | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

The Early Medieval Seaman and the Church: Contacts Ashore

By Robert Miller

This article highlights the interaction of the Church as an institution with its ‘Roving Parishioners’ and deals with the early years of the High Middle Ages (c.1000-1250.) The religious connection with trade is accepted and there are examples of the Royal Permissions given to religious houses in regard of the control of specific ports, collection […] Read More

Filed under: Late Middle Ages | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

The Medical Staffing of the Royal Navy in the Russian War, 1854-6

By Chris Penn

The outbreak of war in 1854 posed numerous manpower problems for the Royal Navy: one of these was in the medical branch, where the Director General Sir William Burnett, thought there was a shortage of assistant surgeons. This paper tests the evidence as regards medical officers, to see if they really were in short supply, […] Read More

Filed under: Baltic | Crimean War | Mediterranean | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies

Cavendish’s Last Voyage Part III: John Jane’s Narrative of the Voyage of the Desire

By R F Hitchcock

This is the last of three papers (see 1994/3 and 2001/1) on Cavendish’s disastrous 1591-93 expedition to the Pacific. This paper concentrates on the narrative of John Jane, who sailed in the fleet as supercargo on the Desire, commanded by John Davis. Cavendish blamed Davis for the failure of the expedition – rightly, it seems. […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors | Mutiny & Discipline | Health at Sea | Pacific
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Science & Exploration

New Light on Anson’s Voyage 1740 – 4: a Mad Sailor on Land and Sea

By R.A. Houston

An account of one of Anson’s crew who suffered madness at sea and, three years after his return, committed a murder in his hometown of Edinburgh. He had previously shown clear evidence of an unbalanced mind. The paper goes into the legal aspects of the life of the murderer before and after four years at […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

The Health of Seamen in Anti-Slavery Squadrons

By Sir James Watt

Tedium interspersed with the dangers of working boats in high surf environments, attacks from slavers and local tribes, and the boarding of slave ships all lead to the highest incidence of illness and death in the Royal Navy. Disease was of particular concern, especially those considered tropical fevers such as malaria, dengue and yellow fever.   […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Other (Nineteenth C) | Health at Sea | Caribbean
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

Disease in the Nineteenth-century Merchant Navy: the Seaman’s Hospital Society Experience

By G.C. Cook

In this article the author examines the various infectious diseases common primarily to merchant seamen and documents the efforts by naval hospitals and medical practitioners to keep them under control. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Administration | Manpower & Life at Sea | Merchant Marines

Soldiers at Sea and the Inter-service Relations during the First Dutch War

By Dr. Eric Gruber von Arni, RRC,RGN, Phd.

The article takes an in-depth look at the role of the soldiers-at-sea on both sides of the conflict during the First Dutch War 1652-1654. This crucial step in the evolution of the ‘fighting sailor’ in the Royal Navy has long been neglected. The author delves into the reasons why such a transition for both the […] Read More

Filed under: Baltic | English Channel | Dutch Wars | North Sea | Mutiny & Discipline | Health at Sea | Press Gangs
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

Cavendish’s Last Voyage Part II: Purposes Revealed and Concealed

By R. F. Hitchcock

The objectives of Thomas Cavendish’s disastrous second voyage (1591-93) were ostensibly to capture Spanish merchant ships and trade with China, repeating the success of his earlier round-the-world expedition.  Analysis of the personnel carried aboard his vessels and surviving accounts, however, suggest that he may have also intended to found a colony at São Vincente, Brazil, […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors | Mutiny & Discipline | Health at Sea | Pacific
Subjects include: Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers | Science & Exploration

The Basque Whalers: the Source of their Success

By Julian de Zulueta

Expert inshore whale hunters since the eleventh century, the Basques eventually had to seek their quarry further afield. For much of the sixteenth century they played the leading role in cod fishing and whaling in the waters of Newfoundland and Labrador. Their success is attributed to the sturdiness of their Biscayan ships, a well-organized system […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Other (Early Modern) | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Science & Exploration | Whaling & Fishing

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