Archive Results For: Health at Sea

The Elizabethan Sailorman

By Florence E. Dyer

The accounts of the maritime expeditions of the Elizabethan Age offer an insight into the lives of the ordinary crew members. They suffered from bad food and inadequate clothing, sleeping on deck or in the hold. Health was the great problem, in particular scurvy. Expedition leaders tried to ensure the health of their crews by […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Francis Drake | The Armada | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Merchant Marines | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers

The Dress of the British Seaman from the Revolution to the Peace of 1748

By G. E. Manwaring

Until the end of the seventeenth century the authorities seemed to pay little attention to the clothing of Royal Navy crews. This changed at the beginning of the new century, when regulations were introduced to regulate both the quality and price of the clothing (commonly referred to as slops) that was available for purchase by […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

The Dress of the British Seaman Part III

By G. E. Manwaring

The author refers to the inadequate dress of seamen. This was not remedied by a regulation of 1641, establishing the sales of them onboard because its application was irregular and their purchase optional, even the prices were fixed by the Navy. Further regulations tried to avoid the abuses, and sited all sales on deck, beside […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | North Sea | Other (Early Modern) | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

The Dress of the British Seaman Part II

By G E Manwaring

Various sources describe an English seaman’s dress in 1598, the generous outfits provided for the Arctic in 1602, naval clothing provided in 1602, and the elaborate attire of an English pirate captured in 1603. During the reign of James I, popular plays highlight the distinctive dress of sailors, but official sources reveal serious inadequacies which […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

Early Ship Surgeons

By Isobel G Powell

Ships in the service of Charles I carried surgeons recruited through the Company of Barber-Surgeons which was sometimes also responsible for procuring and distributing drugs and stores for the ship’s medical chest. Alternatively, the surgeon could receive, in addition to his wages, an allowance to cover these costs, though the amount varied considerably depending upon […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

The Dress of the British Seaman Part I

By G.E. Manwaring

British sailors, in Roman times, wore, poetically, blue or azure leather. The sea-kit of the Cinque ports was a blue woolen tunic.   Chaucer’s 14c seamen preferred blue or brown serge knee-length gowns; still seen recently amongst West Country fishermen.   Cotes, jacketts and doublets, gowns, shirt, hose and shoes were provided to crew.   Tudors liking for […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Antiquity | Medieval | Early Modern | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Administration | Art & Music | Manpower & Life at Sea | Merchant Marines | Navies

Document: A Proposal for Naval Reforms circa 1773

By courtesy of W. G. Perrin

The reproduced memorandum, which is unsigned but clearly from a senior officer with experience of command, provides an extensive list of matters that he felt needed addressing to ensure the more efficient manning of the fleet. It appears to contain the earliest known proposal for standard clothing for seamen and also the reluctance of Officers […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

Document: Rum

By courtesy of Paymaster-Lieut. H. R. H. Vaughan RN

The reproduced contract, with Ransford Waterhouse of London, is the consequence of the order issued by Pepys [see MM Volume 7, Issue 2] substituting rum for brandy for the crews of Navy vessels operating out of Jamaica. Read More

Filed under: Nine Years' War | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

The State of Nelson’s Fleet Before Trafalgar

By J. Holland Rose, Litt.D.

The condition of a fleet after long service reflects on the Admiral’s care. Nelson’s fleet blockaded Toulon for 22 months and then was able to pursue Villeneuve to the West Indies, and back without scurvy or unseaworthiness affecting the ships. On arrival at Spithead, five ships were reported fit for service, six needed inspection or […] Read More

Filed under: Nelson | Atlantic | Napoleonic War | English Channel | Mediterranean | Health at Sea
Subjects include: Logistics | Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

Document: Captain’s Orders for HMS Superb I803-4 Part II

By Contributor not attributed

The second section of Captain Keats’ (the first part being found in MM Vol. 7, Issue 10) orders to the officers and crew of the Superb run from paragraph 23 to 88 and lay down the rules and regulations to be followed in manning and operating the ship. Read More

Filed under: Napoleonic War | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies | Ship Handling & Seamanship

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