Call for Manuscripts: The Materiality of Sino-Foreign Maritime Cultural Exchange

September 2020

 

Call for Manuscripts: The Materiality of Sino-Foreign Maritime Cultural Exchange

To date, the earliest known evidence of Sino-Foreign Maritime Cultural Exchange remains from the Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE) voyages of Emperor Wu’s envoys to Southeast Asia in 111 BCE.1 In the intervening 2,000 years, the sea routes which facilitated this contact, grew into an economic architecture that extended beyond mercantile trade to social interaction, cultural conveyance, diplomatic delegacy, technological transfer, tribute trade, and a shift in geopolitical power that contributed to the development of many of the world’s great civilizations.2

The Centre for Maritime History and Culture Research (CMHCR) at Dalian Maritime University in collaboration with the Department of Archaeology at Helsinki University, invites manuscripts for consideration in a unique edited volume which focuses on the Materiality of the Sino-Foreign Maritime Cultural Exchange and its theoretical underpinnings.

The volume seeks to promote research that evidences, through the study of archaeology, art, history, iconography and the interdisciplinary field of material culture studies, the globalization of Sino-Foreign Maritime Cultural Exchange and the networks which facilitated this. We are particularly interested in new information regarding the manner in which Sino-Foreign social relations were constituted, reproduced, or altered through material forms.

CMHCR welcomes manuscripts on the material aspects of:

  • shipwrecks;
  • dry docks and shipyards;
  • ports, harbours and landing places;
  • maritime cultural landscapes;
  • artworks, artefacts or isolated finds;
  • technological transfer, hybridization and exchange; and the
  • trade and exchange of goods, knowledge, information, legal systems, languages, social practice, ritual and religion, from the earliest times to the present day.

There are no temporal or spatial limitations. Papers that provide new evidence are preferred, and only original researches will be accepted.

English is the official language of the volume. Submissions in English and Chinese are welcome; the Chinese papers will be subject to translation. Submitted articles will be reviewed on a double-blind basis by no fewer than two reviewers drawn from DMU’s international academic community. The final decision regarding acceptance, revision, or rejection will be based on the reviews received, and at the sole discretion of the editorial team.

Abstracts of maximum 300 words, with 4-6 keywords, and author(s) name, affiliation(s), corresponding email, and a short biography of maximum 100 words, should be submitted to sarahward@dlmu.edu.cn no later than 30 November 2020, with “Sino-Foreign Call for Manuscripts” in the subject line. Submissions from early and mid-career researchers are encouraged.

CMHCR will advise successful authors no later than 30 December 2020. Full written papers of approximately 7,000 to 10,000 words in length are due no later than 30 March 2021. CMHCR will provide successful authors with submission guidelines, details of the editorial team, and the publishing program upon acceptance. Publication is expected to be 30 September 2021.

 

For further enquires contact:

Sarah Ward

Centre for Maritime History and Culture Research

Dalian Maritime University,

1 Linghai Road

Dalian 116026 CHINA

 

WeChat: @SarahWardAU

Email: sarahward@dlmu.edu.cn

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