National Maritime Museum Collaborative Doctoral Studentships

March 2015

The History of British Prison Hulks, 1776-1864

 Applications are invited for a doctoral studentship tenable at the University of Leicester in collaboration with the National Maritime Museum (NMM). This doctoral award is funded though the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under its Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships (CDP) scheme. The studentship, which is full-time and funded for 3 years, will begin in October 2015  and will be supervised by Clare Anderson, Professor of History at Leicester, and Dr James Davey, Curator of Naval History at the NMM.

The successful candidate will undertake a project of their choice on the history of prison hulks, in Britain and/or the British Empire, during the period from their founding to their abandonment, 1776-1864. The student will explore the form and function of these ‘floating prisons’ – as jails for criminal prisoners; as sites of confinement for prisoners of war; and/or as holding places for transportation convicts.

Prison Hulk ca.1810 NMM: PAG8260

Prison Hulk ca.1810 NMM: PAG8260

The student will join the vibrant academic community at Leicester, including in the history of metropole/ Empire, and criminal justice history. The School of History was recently ranked 6th nationally for research excellence in The Guardian’s REF subject tables (January 2015.) The student will also become involved in the life of a highly prestigious national museum.

 Full details can be found on this page

 Chronometry and Chronometers on British Voyages of Exploration, c.1815–c.1872

Experimental marine chronometer, Sully "C" NMM: ZBA2248

Experimental marine chronometer, Sully “C” NMM: ZBA2248

Applications are invited for a Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD Studentship, held jointly by the University of Edinburgh (Institute of Geography) and the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, part of the Collaborative Doctoral Partnership (CDP) Thames Consortium, for research on ‘Chronometry and Chronometers on British Voyages of Exploration, c.1815-c.1872’.

The focus of the PhD will be to examine the ways in which nineteenth-century British voyages of exploration used chronometers in their routine navigation and more specialised expeditionary activities. The aim is to cover the period that saw chronometers becoming standard on naval vessels (by about 1830), but before the advent of more science-based oceanic exploration from the early 1870s, and to explore how on-board practices changed and developed in this period of significant exploratory activity.

The studentship, which is full-time and funded for 3 years, will begin in October 2015 and will be jointly supervised by Dr Richard Dunn (National Maritime Museum, Greenwich) and Professor Charles W. J. Withers (University of Edinburgh).  

Full details can be found on this page.

Category:

Topmasts Newsletters

Topmasts

Topmasts Archive