Reply To: Admiralty's 1758 building programme for ships-of-the-line

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#10029
Malcolm Lewis
Participant

    Thank you members for this interesting information.
    Ships built in private yards were masted and had their carved decoration carried out in the Royal Dockyards. Those built on the Thames would presumably be ferried downstream to Chatham.
    Agamemnon, 64 guns launched 1781 at Buckler’s Hard on the Beaulieu River, was said to have taken six days to be ferried downriver and eastwards along the Solent to Portsmouth.
    Taking into account the complex tidal conditions and sandbanks of the Solent it would have presented a challenge to get this valuable hull safely to the dockyard. I have asked the museum at Beaulieu for any information about this regular task but without success.
    Few members of the ferrying crew would have been aboard so perhaps anchoring at a change of tide would not have been an option. I assume the hull would have been towed by rowing boats and maybe moored, when the tides were adverse, at dolphins.
    This situation would also have presented itself to shipbuilders on the Hamble River and the East Coast yards.
    Are there any references to ferrying new hulls to dockyards?
    Malcolm Lewis