Reply To: Tacking vs. wearing square-riggers — relative time and distance

Home Forums Nautical Research: 1500 – 1830 Tacking vs. wearing square-riggers — relative time and distance Reply To: Tacking vs. wearing square-riggers — relative time and distance

#10545
Frank Scott
Participant

    Your scenario now makes sense, if I understand your diagram correctly. It has the wind from the East (though you state west), so the ships in the squadron are well off the wind, rather than close-hauled, and are making only a moderate course alteration. So they could wear in succession, just as a parade ground formation does a ‘wheel’. The wind will merely move from the starboard quarter to the post beam. No problem at all, just a case of ‘follow my leader’, and no loss of speed.

    Other points:
    There should be no problem tacking such small vessels at 3 knots in what I take to be smooth water. Could be a problem if there was a lumpy sea left after bad weather, more sea than wind is never good for performance.
    A point is 11.25 degrees, so 32 = 360 degrees.
    The problem with wearing in succession when going from close-hauled on one tack, to close-hauled on the other, is that the lead ships have to pass through the line of vessels that are still on the original heading, so there is an obvious risk of collision.