Reply To: 18th century shipbuilding – use of beech for "walls"

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#12140
Nicholas Blake
Participant

    The garboard strake is the first line of planks, attached to the keel, so ‘from thence’ means as far upward as the light waterline. The timing means that beech is to be used if the ship is to be launched within three months (presumably the idea was that if the ship was needed urgently then inferior build quality mattered less). East Country plank was oak plank from the Baltic or surrounds. Steel gives a full explanation of how this works in practice here: <https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=pjcDAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA201&dq=%22east+country+plank%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi-2c6Xs6rMAhXkJ8AKHUcUBpwQ6AEIIjAB#v=onepage&q=%22east%20country%20plank%22&f=false&gt; (Unfortunately the Googlers didn’t unfold the plates before scanning.) He also says that these four or six strakes may be of elm or beech.

    All the timbers mentioned in this warrant were inferior to oak, and only used because oak was running out.