Reply To: Barricado or Barricade?

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#18783
David Hepper
Participant

From Alexander Falconbridge, An Account of the Slave Trade on the Coast of Africa (London, 1788), on describing the layout of a typical slave ship:
“Near the mainmast a partition is constructed of boards which reaches athwart the ship. This division is called a barricado. It is about eight feet in height and is made to project about two feet over the sides of the ship. In this barricado there is a door at which a sentinel is placed during the time the Negroes are permitted to come upon the deck. It serves to keep the different sexes apart; and as there are small holes in it, where blunderbusses are fixed and sometimes a cannon, it is found very convenient for quelling the insurrections that now and then happen…”
[http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~wedderburn/genealogy/falconbridge.htm]

For an example of this, see the log of the slaver Count du Nord, entries for 18 November and 21 November 1783 where the term Barricado is used
https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/5e8c9c20-5d58-4ece-9a9a-0d29e1596a01

For naval uses, see a letter of 1747 which refers to a barricado:
https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C9784247

and another from 1786…
https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C14185147