Reply To: Royal Navy Submarine Command , Control and Communications in WW2

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#2509
Anonymous

    I undestand that the Rugby transmission was at a frequency chosen to follow the curvature of the earth [about 10 Kiloherts]. The phenomenon that allows this to happen is well known. The wave is slowed near the earth’s surface for reasons which we need not address. which causes the wave to bend, and in the case of Rugby, follow the cuvature with some precision. This, coupled with the power of the transmitter, was designed to ensure world-wide communications. A bye-product was that the induced ground or water wave under the signal penetrated to some depth, although it was comparatively weak. I have always uderstood that this was used for command receiving purposes by the submarine fleet.
    One or two submarine commanders who wrote up their experiences in World War II refered to it in passing. I believe both Mars and Young made comments, but do not have time at present to research their books. Whether it actually performed world-wide I cannot say, as I have no knowledge of an authoritataive statement on the matter.

    I feel certain that sufficient information could be recovered from veterans both of the Post Office, who operated that facility, and the Royal Navy, to define fully what happened.
    Paul Quinn