Reply To: Asunción – a 18th century Spanish ship-of-the-line or frigate

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#3698
Aldo Antonicelli
Participant

Bob,

Thank you for the very useful link you have provided.
From the time I posted the query on the Society’s forum I have made further research on the matter of the Asuncion and I have located other sources.
Most probably the Asuncion bought by the Royal Sardinian Navy was a merchantman captured by the British Navy after the surrender of Havana on August 1762, along as many other men-of war and merchant vessels; her former owner was the Spanish Compañia de la Habana.
In the National Archives of England and Wales I have located the Asuncion’s log which cover the voyage that the ship made as part of the large convoy bound for England under Admiral George Pocock. She was commanded by Captain James Randell and she got under way from Havana on 3 November 1762; on 3 April 1763 she moored at Gravesend.
Both the location and date of arrival fits well the date of the purchase made by the Italian officer.
The Three Decks website lists an Asuncion owned by the Compañia de la Habana rated as a 50 gun ship, which is exactly the number of guns recorded by the Italian officer for the ship he had purchased.
Thank you, Aldo