Anchor Identification Help!

Home Forums Nautical Research: Miscellaneous Anchor Identification Help!

Tagged: 

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #18924
    Sam Willis
    Keymaster

    Hi everyone,

    Frank Higham has got in touch with an interesting anchor discovery! Can anyone help?

    ‘This is a photo of an anchor that was dredged up by fisherman off Blyth/Tyne a few years ago and given to our yacht club.
    Any thoughts as to what sort of vessel it may be from?’

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #18926
    Frank Scott
    Participant

    In the 19th century various improved versions of the Admiralty pattern (Fisherman’s) anchor were put forward, some of which had the shank ending in a fork, to which the crown and arms were bolted in such a manner that they would swivel under load so that one arm could dig in forcing the other hard up against the shank. The most widely used was that by Trotman, which was judged to be 28% superior to the Admiralty pattern in 1852 trials. The photo looks like a ‘Trotman’ with an iron stock.
    B.N. Curryer, Anchors: An Illustrated History (London, 1999) is a useful short guide to the history of anchors.

    #18927
    Sam Willis
    Keymaster

    Thanks Frank,

    Frank and his colleagues at the Royal Northumbrian Yacht Club are particularly interested in the size of ship it may have come from. Does anyone have any ideas on that?
    S

    #18928
    Frank Scott
    Participant

    If they work out size & approx weight then Lloyd’s Rules should give max size of vessel. These anchors were more expensive than standard admiralty pattern, but one extra advantage (apart from holding power) was that rotation of crown and arms so that upper set where hard on shank meant that vessel much less at risk of serious damage if it ‘sat’ on anchor as tide dropped. Worth having really detailed look for maker’s marks, etc., which may be obscured by accretions and corrosion.

    #18930
    Frank Higham
    Participant

    Many thanks for the information – had a quick chat to a yacht club member yesterday who may have more info on the origins (he bought it from the fisherman for the scrap value which they agreed at £300 at the time) Will post more details after I have seen him later.

    #18961
    Frank Scott
    Participant

    I see that you have posted some more photos on the SNR facebook page. Certainly looks like a Trotman. Almost certainly carried by a steam ship, as sailing vessels generally stuck to the cheaper admiralty pattern.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.