Schooner SUPPLY 1832 – 1861

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  • #14088
    Peter. H. King
    Participant

      In connection with my on-going research into the history of this vessel, I would like to seek advice on the insertion of the word “Sharp” in the first column of the Lloyds Register 1833 edition. This was clearly a reference to her hull form, but were there any delineating measures in terms of Block Coefficient or Waterplane Area Coefficient which triggered the insertion of “Sharp”, or was it merely the attending surveyor’s impression of the hull form. MacGregor pondered on the use of “Sharp” in Lloyds Register in “Fast Sailing Ships”, but did not offer any judgement upon the scientific basis of its use. Any assistance would be sincerely appreciated.

      Peter H King

      #14091
      Frank Scott
      Participant

        If you could give the page ref for David MacGregor that would help. However, he was so meticulous that there is little or no hope for the rest of us if he failed to establish the definition of ‘Sharp’ in Lloyd’s Register!

        Frank

        #14092
        Frank Scott
        Participant

          I posted this query on the MarHst-L Forum & received the following response from Maurice Smith:

          “Howard Irving Chapelle, The Search For Speed Under Sail, has a number of paragraphs devoted to the definition of ‘sharp’ with some comparison to the British model, block coefficient etc. A few drawings are included to illustrate his discussion. Sharp frigate and sharp model are indexed.
          No direct reference to Lloyds.”

          Frank

          #14095
          Peter. H. King
          Participant

            Many thanks, Frank and Maurice,

            Reference in MacGregor is page 89 (1st edition) Clipper Schooner section. I will follow through Chapelle, looks promising.Thanks
            My research into SUPPLY’s form has proved to be very challenging. An image of a schooner s.t.b. SUPPLY on a Kiribati stamp has left me with doubts as to its provenance – unfortunately, the designer died 6 years before I tracked him down! She was built by James Balley, Shoreham, for the Commissioners for the Improvement and Development of Dublin Harbour (the Dublin Ballast Board) as their lighthouse inspection vessel. Insofar that Trinity House had responsibilities under the then M.S.A. for the superintendence and management of the Irish lighthouse service, I surmised that T.H. would probably have specified and supervised SUPPLY’s construction, but unfortunately the T.H. archives make no reference to her. I have scrutinised at length the manuscript journal of her commander, Thomas Fairclough, 1851 – 1853 when she was engaged in the coconut oil trade from the Gilbert Islands to Sydney (State Library of NSW) and this has thrown up a lot of clues, particularly rigging and sail plan. I have also considered Admiralty draughts, since these would have been the likely source of T.H. engagement, but contemporary RN schooners of like dimensions would have been too full form to fit the bill; draughts taken from captured slavers would seem to hold promise. SUPPLY was certainly notably fast and fine of form.

            Peter

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