Stephen B. G

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  • in reply to: The Mariner’s Mirror Podcast #22329
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Sam,
    Just listened to the latest podcast on the Maritime History of WWII. Excellent! Really appreciated your guest and his insights. Your excursion into the beginnings of the U.S. Navy was interesting as well as his thoughts about the research and process of developing the book. His mention of Alexander Hamilton brought to mind Hamilton’s attempt to provide the new nation with a nascent naval force by forming the Revenue Cutter Service, the precursor of the U.S. Coast Guard. Late in the broadcast he mentioned the shipbuilding that took place (Liberty ships, amphibious craft, etc.) and seemed to say that there are no examples of WWII LSTs still afloat. You might pass on to him that there is one that is still on exhibit in the town of Evansville, Indiana: https://www.lstmemorial.org/. I haven’t visited, but from the website it seems like they’ve kept LST-325 in WWII configuration.

    Thanks again for the podcast! Looking forward to your next episode!

    in reply to: The Oldest Vessel Afloat #22066
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    One more historic U.S. Coast Guard vessel, this one a veteran of the Prohibition Era in the U.S., in which the Coast Guard played a central role:
    USCGC McLane WSC-146 (WMEC-146), Active class patrol boat, 1927, Muskegon, MI

    in reply to: The Oldest Vessel Afloat #22065
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Here are a few old U.S. Coast Guard vessels still afloat:
    USCGC Lilac WLM-227, a lighthouse tender, 1933–lower Manhattan, NYC
    USCGC Ingham WHEC-35, Secretary (of the Treasury) class cutter, 1936, Key West, FL
    USCGC WHEC-37 (formerly the Taney), Secretary class cutter 1936, Baltimore, MD
    USCGC Eagle WIX-327 (formerly the Barque Horst Wessel), USCG Academy sail training vessel, 1936, New London, CT
    USCG Nantucket LV-112, Lightship, 1936, Boston, MA?
    USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83, Icebreaker, 1944, Mackinaw City, MI
    CG36500 Lifeboat (SS Pendleton rescue, restored and occasionally afloat, 1946, Orleans, MA –this one is cradled most of the time, but due to the interest in the Pendleton rescue generated by the book The Finest Hours and movie (2016) the lifeboat has been restored, regularly launched, and run from her berth in Orleans, MA.

    in reply to: The Mariner’s Mirror Podcast #21950
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Thank you, Sam! You must have read my mind! I see the new Iconic Ship is USS Constitution!
    Well done!

    in reply to: The Mariner’s Mirror Podcast #21930
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Let’s try a smaller file

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    in reply to: The Mariner’s Mirror Podcast #21929
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Sam,

    Just listened to and thoroughly enjoyed the “Iconic Ships” podcast featuring the Cutty Sark. Visited her first in the 1980’s and more recently (March 2019) had a chance to walk through her post-fire. A magnificent ship, and the enclosed drydock and ability to walk along the length of her underbody is fascinating. The commentary by the curators got me thinking of other iconic ships I’ve visited. I was thinking that so far the series has been on British ships, although the Mayflower has a place in both American and British history. There’s what I would consider an iconic ship that is thoroughly American that you might consider featuring, the U.S.S. Constitution, which is preserved and on display in the Charlestown Navy Yard in metro Boston. I realize that for your British and Canadian audience, this vessel might be a sore point. Years ago I had the great fortune of obtaining an original Thomas Birch print of the engagement between the USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere (see attached) at a small antiques shop in Halifax, Nova Scotia. When I expressed my interest in the print to the Canadian shop owner, she was more than happy to sell it to me–“Good riddance” was her comment. It hangs in my study next to another print from that same war. But, all things considered, the vessel was unique for the day in its design and construction, and in battle earned the moniker “Old Ironsides” for which it is still known, I think it merits the phrase “iconic” at least on this side of the pond.

    Thanks again for the podcast,
    Stephen Glynn

    in reply to: The Mariner’s Mirror Podcast #21915
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Sam:
    Long time member, and previous forum contributor. I was just listening to the podcast–the terrific episode on the “Sunken Library”–and heard your call for suggestions for topics. Here’s one that you might go after, and that’s the many sail training “school ships” as some have very interesting histories. I’d like to call your attention to one that maintains special memories for me, the USCGC Eagle, previously the Horst Wessel. As a cadet I was on two training cruises aboard Eagle in the 1970’s. Attached is an article from the local New London, CT paper (the Academy is in New London) about the Coast Guard’s acquisition of the Eagle, post-WWII, commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Eagle as a Coast Guard cutter.
    Stephen Glynn
    glynn@htc.net
    618-978-6783
    P.S. in 1980 the original teak decking of the Eagle was replaced, and through a friend there at the shipyard I happened to obtain a foot-long piece of that teak decking which I have here in my study.

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    in reply to: The Mariner’s Mirror Podcast #19659
    Stephen B. G
    Participant

    Listened to the first episode of the podcast on my morning walk. Excellent, anxious to listen to more. You mentioned a wide variety of topics you plan to cover. Three I didn’t hear mentioned, but I’d like to suggest would be:
    1) Sail Training Vessels. I am a graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and sailed aboard the Eagle, a war reparation vessel (was the Horst Vessel), and what an outstanding introduction to the sea, maritime heritage, and history for a kid from Midwestern United States.
    2) Life Saving Services. Of course with my background, I’d love to hear more about the RNLI and similar services around the world, and their very specialized vessels and equipment.
    3) Ethnographic Vessels. I am thinking about the variety of self-made craft used around the world. Of course I have a special fondness for the coracle, and just recently watched a documentary on the Afon Towy, showing fishermen in coracles at night on the river at Carmarthen.
    But whatever you cover, I am going to be listening. Great way to stir interest in all things maritime.
    Sincerely,
    Stephen Glynn
    Columbia, Illinois, USA
    glynn@htc.net

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