Alistair Roach

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  • in reply to: Building the Viking longship #14913
    Alistair Roach
    Participant

    Further to my last message. I’ve just logged on to the museum website. If you go to the English version and then trawl down there is a feature entitled ‘200 year old oak to be cleaved at the Viking Ship Museum’ This dates from September and the ‘log’ in question is 8m long and they are just using hammers and wedges, etc.to split the oak trunk. As always. Alistair

    in reply to: Building the Viking longship #14912
    Alistair Roach
    Participant

    Dear Malcolm,
    Can I point you in the direction of the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, Denmark – http://www.vikingeskibsmuseet.dk They have built various replica ships based on original archaeological finds. Their biggest, based on Skuldelev 2 at 29.4m long, was built 2000-4 and named ‘The Sea Stallion from Glendalough’. Dedrdo. dating of timbers showed the original ship had been made out of oak felled near Dublin in the summer of 1042 – hence the name. The Museum has published various books and pamphlets – one called ‘Welcome on board! The Sea Stallion from Glendalough’ ISBN 9788785180414. This is only a 68p booklet but gives a potted history of its history, building and sailing. There are some gems in this book which may help your query e.g. under ‘tools’ they state that the most important tools were axes and augers but one tool, the saw, is lacking in Viking Age ship building. Although the tool was known at the time there is no evidence of it being used on ship finds! They also list materials e.g. the planks took 14 oaks of 8-10m in height and 1m in diameter at chest height and the planks with oarports were made from 4 ashes of 10m in height by 35cm in diameter at chest height, etc.etc. and they are all cleft! Certainly looking on-line at various websites that relate to ‘The Sea Stallion’ or with Roskilde Museum should help and also to get some of the museum’s publications. Good luck with your research. Alistair.

    in reply to: Coastal Motorboats 1908 to 1918 #9790
    Alistair Roach
    Participant

    Charlie – I’m not sure how far you’ve got with your researches but the following may be of assistance.

    Plans of various CMBs are available via the NMM.
    Model Shipwright published a two-page article on the general history of CMBs in their June 1996 edition. No.96 – pp50-51.
    Marine Modelling International produced a four page article with a free plan for a Thornycroft 55ft CMB in their April 2008 edition. pp39-42. The author of this article quotes ‘Fast Fighting Ships 1870-1945‘ by Harold Fox (1978) and ‘Coastal Forces Vessels of the Royal Navy from 1865‘ by M.P.Cocker (2006) as his references.
    To get a flavour of CMBs at work Augustus Agar’s own book ‘Baltic Episode‘ published by Conway Maritime Press in 1963 is certainly worth a read. Part of the book relates to the action when Agar wins the VC and DSO with CMB4 (now at Duxford as mentioned above).

    There is a rather good film clip entitled ‘Osea Island, Essex: Secret Naval Base at Secret Island‘. This was taken during WW1 and shows the set up at HMS Osea, boats being armed and serviced, etc. It can be viewed on the internet via BBC-World War1 or just type in the heading.

    http://www.churchside1.plus.com/Goldhanger-past also has a rather good section on Osea Island showing a plan of the establishment when in operation, a list of personnel, a photographic reconstruction of the site – including launching ramps, etc.

    Hopefully some of the above may be of help.

    Best wishes
    Alistair Roach

    in reply to: Admiralty thanks for Inventions #2885
    Alistair Roach
    Participant

    Thank you. I do already have The Torpedomen plus Flotillas, a hard-lying story by [Captain Lionel] Dawson (1933), Endless Story [: being an account of the work of the destroyers, flotilla-leaders, torpedo-boats and patrol boats in the Great War] by ‘Taffrail’ [Captain Taprell Dorling (1931)] and The Harwich [Naval Forces : their part in the Great War], E F Knight (1919). All good material but no hint as to where any inventions may be listed or found.
    Looking at the bibliography in Torpedomen I thought the MoD Library may be worth a search.
    Just for information the person I am searching for is Gunner(T) Arthur James Roach Royal Navy, and the inventions appear to have been made between 1917 and 1919.

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