Nicholas Blake

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 46 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Bio needed for Nehemiah Bourne #22088
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    Here are the current and the 1885 entries (in Word to preserve the formatting).

    The correct MM reference if you want to pursue it is “vol 12(3) p237 : Bibliography of British naval lives, 1640-60. “Sailors of the Civil War, the
    Commonwealth and the Protectorate.” Article by Charles H. Firth”

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    in reply to: Officers joining ships #21997
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    The fact that Lapenotiere submitted an expense claim suggests he at least paid them in cash. Lt Lapenotiere’s expenses were £46 19s 1d, quite a large amount for a lieutenant whose basic sea pay was £7 per lunar month. Here is his claim for expenses.

    Officers generally preferred to travel their ships by sea in another RN ship. In 1809 a lieutenant of the marines was asked about an event on board the Thracian and replied ‘ A: ‘…I was on board between a fortnight and three weeks I went on board the 22nd of Decr. I think for a passage to join my ship the Euryalus, and left her about the fourth fifth or sixth of January on her arrival at Spithead.’

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    in reply to: Powder magazine & powder monkeys #21995
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    A large sloop in the Georgian RN would keep powder in the magazine, aka the powder room, which was aft in the hold (frigates and above had it forward). There was an adjacent filling room with shelves for storing filled cartridges, and tools. The hold was very dark so to limit the risk of explosion the candles used were kept in the light room, which was a glass compartment between the two. Attached is a diagram of the cutter Alert of 1777, which will give you the general idea.

    The boys would go to the magazine as required, with wooden or metal cartridge cases. If the ship was in action, the supply would be as nearly continuous as possible, so would be prepared when the ship cleared for action.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    in reply to: Carronade gun crew #21994
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    A 12pdr carronade was originally (in 1779) 2ft 2in long and weighed 5.75cwt. By 1800 it had increased to 2ft 8in and 6-6.25cwt. A carronade of that size would typically have a crew of four.

    in reply to: Hats in the Royal Navy #20921
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    For the man in green I would say felt; but for all RN clothing questions in this period, @slopclothes on Twitter is your authority.

    in reply to: Lieutenant signs captain’s log #20865
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    In the captain’s absence an officer on board, usually the next in seniority, became the commanding officer, so it seems reasonable that he would sign the log.

    in reply to: Ship Graffiti #20863
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    Here is the Howe.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    in reply to: Ship Graffiti #20861
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    The Ranville ship is, if accurate, built in the last quarter of the eighteenth century, or possibly a little earlier, similar to the ship with the white bottom attached (a model of the Duke, launched in 1777). The other image is the Howe, launched 1815; she has a flatter sheer, which provides a reasonable end date. The indicators are the masts, sheer, and closed stern, though the graffito has far too few ports for a real ship of that size presumably because they would be too small to carve out. Although both photos are of British ships, the differences between them and French ship are too small to matter for a graffito. It’s to stylised to provide clues to a real ship.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    in reply to: The Ayshford Complete Trafalgar Roll, query. #20841
    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    You can download the muster roll for the Victory from the National Archives site, if that is any help. Or if you put the name and the details in the forum someone may have what you need.

    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    27 November reads (contractions expanded): “Ditto weather. AM Detained a Spanish sloop for Jamaica to Legan with [ie carrying] wine and flower [flour].”
    28 November: “Ditto weather. PM Spoke [ie stopped and talked to] the General Wolfe a letter of marque ship [private ship licensed to capture ships of a named enemy country] from Jamaica to London. AM Discharged the Spanish sloop.” Note for AM and PM, the ship’s day started at noon, and was half a day in arrears of the civil day.

    If Maria Belle was taken on board as a slave belonging to a foreigner she would have been treated as free and given a berth somewhere below, and probably put to use on board with cleaning and similar duties; she should appear on the “borne for victuals” list.

    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    There was only one Captain Josiah Nisbet in the Royal Navy, and he was Nelson’s stepson as you say, so this is either the real thing or a good copy. Quite a find indeed.

    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    He makes a few captures but the only relevant one is a Spanish sloop, which he detains on 27 November and lets go on the 28th, though not as a prize.

    If this is the ship in question and the Spanish woman came on board the event would usually be in the log, but the next two steps once Kew re-opens are:
    1 order ADM 1/2049 and 2050. These are letters from captains, surnames L, for 1760 and 1761-62. If they survive, there should be a letter or letters from him detailing the event, taking her onboard, etc.
    2 order ADM 36/6867. This is the Trent’s muster book for 01.08.59-30.04.61, and if she was on board she should be in a list at the end headed “Borne for victuals” (ie the ship gave her food and drink). However given Dido’s status she may well have been treated as a lady, and accommodated in one of the officers’ cabins (everybody moving down one), in part of Lindesay’s quarters, or even in his cabin (everybody moving down one), which would give the opportunity for the necessary intimacy. If she was a lady there may be a claim for the expense of her dining at his table in ADM 1/2049 and 2050.

    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    His latitude and longitude are N and W of Greenwich and he is on passage from Guinea to the Leeward Islands.

    6 October is Cape St Magnus
    18 October is Nevis
    19 October is Old Road, St Christopher
    23 October is St Eustatia 5 leagues away
    24 October is St Bartholomew bearing E, 5 miles

    The entries that show him possibly leaving the ship are:
    20 and 21 October, moored in Old Road St Christopher, watering the ship (ie filling the barrels with fresh drinking water)

    If you would like to supply the complete set for those two months we can see where he goes.

    N.

    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    Photo 1 confirms the ship was moored in Charles Town Harbour on Monday 3rd March but as David says, nine months earlier is October or November. Incidentally, if you’re photographing logs etc. colour photos are much easier to read, even if the writing is only in black ink.

    Nicholas Blake
    Participant

    If you post the pictures of the log we can help decipher it.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 46 total)