C. M

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  • in reply to: Naval Staff histories – RN Submarine Vols1-3 #2719
    C. M
    Participant

    I managed to obtain a copy of volume 2 on cd from the National Archive, but I am still looking for paper copies of all three volumes.

    in reply to: Mark 8** Torpedo #2612
    C. M
    Participant

    Thank you for your comments. Would anybody have a reference for the manual?

    in reply to: Royal Navy Submarine Command , Control and Communications in WW2 #2510
    C. M
    Participant

    The subject that interests me is more of the waterspace management than the transmissions of the signals. Can anybody elaborate how this was achieved in the 1939-1945 period?

    in reply to: RN Submarine Refits in the USA in World War 2 #2423
    C. M
    Participant

    I contacted the NHB and unfortunately drew a blank. They have dates for when individual submarines were in US dockyards, but that is the extent of their records.
    I am still looking for information on what work actually took place.
    I have discovered a museum near the Portsmouth Navy Yard in New Hampshire that has a decorative wooden board with HMS Pandora‘s badge upon it. The rest of the board’s design incorporates dragons on either side so it must have been made in the Far East before the war started.
    If any member is interested to see an image of this board please email me and I will send a copy of the photograph I have of it.

    in reply to: The 4th Submarine Flotilla, Royal Navy, in the 1930s #2492
    C. M
    Participant

    I find it quite odd that no member has responded to this query. The 4th were the RN striking arm for this area during the inter war period. The RN had no capital ships to spare and the submarine flotilla would have been in the front line in WW2 if they had not been withdrawn to help unsuccessfully in the Mediterranean.
    Many of those attached to the flotilla in the inter-war period had formulated numerous plans against the Imperial Japanese Navy which could have changed the war dramatically.

    in reply to: Royal Navy Submarine Command , Control and Communications in WW2 #2508
    C. M
    Participant

    From what I can gather from various published sources, operations in home waters seem to have been organised from Northways,in North London and foreign operations by each of the respective Submarine Flotilla commanders. There is nothing that I can find that refers to how the whole submarine operation of the Royal Navy was co-ordinated within the RN or with other interested parties such as ASW aircraft, and ships.
    I am also keen to find operational tasking orders and signals to RN submarines for the period 1940-43.
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    C. M
    Participant

    Paul Chapman’s book Submarine Torbay, London 1989, mentions taking two USN officers on patrols with them as observers before the United States had entered the war (page 44 and page 144).
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    C. M
    Participant

    The officer I am specifically interested in is Lieutenant R. Raymond USN. If you make any enquiries with the USN attache would you please include this officer.
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    C. M
    Participant

    Can anybody help me in tracing the personal record of this USN officer?
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    C. M
    Participant

    The officer I am interested in is LT R. Raymond USN. He accompanied Commander JW Linton VC on a number of patrols aboard HM Submarine Turbulent in 1942.
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    C. M
    Participant

    My apologies to you. I meant to write observer in my original post.
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    in reply to: Italian Navy Historical Branch #2459
    C. M
    Participant

    There are a number of possible causes of the loss of HM Submarine Turbulent in 1943. The following is from a source on the useful website Uboat.net (URL http://www.uboat.net/forums/read.php22,65526,65526#msg-65526)

    “ARDITO’S patrol report has survived, relevant extracts can be found in ‘La Lotta Antisommergibile’ (Ufficio Storico [the Italian naval historical branch]).
    “At 07:45 [on the] 6 March [1943] ARDITO reported sighting a Ju88 bomber dropping a depth-charge in position 264° – Punta Licosa (Salerno) – 34 miles. This was 3,000 meters ahead of her position and the Italian torpedo-boat rushed to the attack while the convoy altered course to port. Asdic contact was obtained at 1300 meters (the torpedo-boat was equipped with S-Gerät) and dropped a pattern of depth-charges (the actual number is not listed), the torpedo-boat lost contact at 09:35. The attack is not well documented and the Ufficio Storico has indicated that it doubted the sinking was achieved but one must add that at the time they were very much convinced that TURBULENT had carried out the attack on PRINCIPESSA MAFALDA so the ARDITO’s version was not given much credence.
    “One must add that the next day, at 15:57, another aircraft escorting the LAMPO convoy also reported a submarine 240° – Punta Carena (Capri) – 15 miles. This sighting was not confirmed. It was not rare that a genuine sighting was followed by many bogus ones. But if this sighting was real then TURBULENT may have survived the attack of the previous day and so the loss by mine would be the most likely explanation.”

    The other possibilities refer to an Italian report of a detonation in one of their minefields off La Madallena on 17 March 1943. Linton (Captain Edward Linton, commander of the Turbulent, awarded the VC posthumously after the loss of his boat was confirmed), had been in this area on previous patrols, however some of the fields had been resown with German anti-submarine mines.
    The final possibility was an attack reported by the Teti, an Italian anti-submarine trawler. This was only a vague report and has been discounted. Until the wreck is found we will never know for sure what caused the loss of Turbulent.
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    in reply to: Italian Navy Historical Branch #2457
    C. M
    Participant

    Thank you for the links. There is a possibility that Ardito was the vessel which fatefully damaged HMS Turbulent in 1943.
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

    in reply to: The AIB and Osborne 1915-20 #2417
    C. M
    Participant

    I have exchanged emails with Dr Jane Harrold from Britannia Royal Naval College and she has provided a photograph of the officer I am researching(Commander JW Linton VC) whilst he was at Dartmouth.

    in reply to: The AIB and Osborne 1915-20 #2413
    C. M
    Participant

    A member of the SNR produced a book on Osborne a number of years ago which was sponsored by the society.The member is Michael Partridge and the book is entitled “The Royal Naval College Osborne”
    Christopher Morgan-Jones

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