Lawrie Phillips

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  • in reply to: Naval Officers in Parliament #22766
    Lawrie Phillips
    Participant

      What of naval ratings in Parliament? During the Second World War did serving naval personnel who were also MPs wear uniform in the House of Commons? A.P. Herbert, the humorist, had served as an officer in the RNVR – the Royal Naval Division – during the First World War. In 1939 he enlisted in the River Emergency Service which operated on the Thames. When that Service merged with the Royal Naval Auxiliary Patrol he was made a Petty Officer with, I am told, authority to fly the White Ensign in his converted canal boat Water Gipsy. This all sounds remarkable. I read that he wore his naval uniform on all occasions – if this included the chamber of the House of Commons he may have been the only serving naval rating ever to have done so. Can this be true?

      LAWRIE PHILLIPS

      in reply to: Ship’s wheel #21773
      Lawrie Phillips
      Participant

        HWL? Harland and Wolff Limited?

        in reply to: Admiralty despatch riders #19330
        Lawrie Phillips
        Participant

          David
          Hannah Roberts two years ago published The WRNS in Wartime. The Women’s Royal Naval Service 1917-45 (I.B.Tauris ISBN 978 1 78831 001 7) which contains (pp.104-107) a few first-hand reminiscences of Wren dispatch riders in the Second World War.There are some cross references to Laughton Mathews Blue Tapestry. There is a couple of good photographs of ‘Admiralty Despatch Riders’ in WRNS in Camera. The Women’s Royal Naval Service in the Second World War by Lesley Thomas and Chris Howard Bailey (Suttons and Royal Naval Museum Publications, 2002, ISBN 0 7509 1370 3). Both pics are in the National Museum of the Royal Navy collections.
          Lawrie

          in reply to: THE NAVAL SERVICE #19090
          Lawrie Phillips
          Participant

            David, James,
            Thanks

            in reply to: FISHERY PROTECTION #19089
            Lawrie Phillips
            Participant

              Thanks, Frank

              in reply to: God bless this ship and all that sail in it #17467
              Lawrie Phillips
              Participant

                I did not know that the SNR had a policy of using ‘it’ in reference to ships. If this is so, when was this decision made? The text on the inside front cover of The Mariner’s Mirror refers to ‘her’ restoration concerning HMS Victory and to ‘her’ role regarding Foudroyant.
                In another forum I have expressed regret at longstanding naval custom being overridden and discarded by current -and ephemeral – gender sensitivities and I questioned just who is taking the long view. In this case, what respect is being shown to those generations of sailors down the many centuries, in battle and the breeze, who knew their ships as ‘she’ and ‘her’? What value do we put on ‘their art, craft and mystery … in all ages and among all nations’?
                We all are but very temporary stewards of a proud heritage and we should exercise our responsibility with care and proper humility.

                in reply to: Irish and Welsh speakers in RN ships #2950
                Lawrie Phillips
                Participant

                  Captain Jack Aubrey, sometime Captain of HMS Surprise, turned a blind eye – or a deaf ear – to his Surgeon, Dr Stephen Maturin, conversing in ‘Irish’ with one or two members of the ship’s company.
                  Lawrie Phillips

                  in reply to: Nelson and Gibraltar #2889
                  Lawrie Phillips
                  Participant

                    Thank you. I am most grateful for your expert advice.

                    in reply to: The tradition of mast stepping #2853
                    Lawrie Phillips
                    Participant

                      Nine coins of the Realm were placed beneath the masts of the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert at Pembroke Dockyard, all dated 1899, the year of her launching. These were recovered when the ship was broken up and were displayed in a case on board HMY Britannia.

                      in reply to: The War of 1812 at sea #2709
                      Lawrie Phillips
                      Participant

                        And another – if the Great Lakes can count as ‘at sea’. In 2002 our Canadian Overseas Corresponding Member, Professor Barry Gough, published his Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. The War of 1812 and its Aftermath, Annapolis, ISBN 1-55068-114-1.

                        in reply to: The War of 1812 at sea #2708
                        Lawrie Phillips
                        Participant

                          Our fellow member, Robert Gardiner, edited a fine work: The Naval War of 1812, London 1998 (ISBN 1 86176 063 9). There were some First Division contributors – and SNR worthies – Andrew Lambert, Roger Morriss and Robert Malcomson.

                          in reply to: Naval History in Madeira? #2496
                          Lawrie Phillips
                          Participant

                            John, Tony and Frank
                            Many thanks for your invaluable advice – my acknowledgement is belated due to a swan to sunny climes – see the Naval History in Madeira? query below.
                            Lawrie

                            in reply to: News of Waterloo brought to London by the Royal Navy? #2380
                            Lawrie Phillips
                            Participant

                              I have since found a piece in The Times of 23 June 1815 (p.2 col.A) referring to a London Gazette Extraordinary of the previous day, Thursday 22 June, which reports that:
                              ‘Major the Honourable H. Percy arrived late last night [?21 June] with a dispatch from Field Marshal the Duke of Wellington KG to Earl Bathurst, his Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for the War Department, …..’
                              sent from Waterloo June 19 1815.

                              Facts confound what had the makings of a very promising story …

                              in reply to: ‘Broad Arrow’ #2337
                              Lawrie Phillips
                              Participant

                                There are entries on the origins of the Broad Arrow in The Mariner’s Mirror:

                                – Vol 1: pp 49, 139, 183, 217, 282

                                – Vol 2: pp 57, 88, 123

                                – Vol 5: pp 24, 59

                                – Vol 6: pp 220, 251

                                – Vol 7: p 188

                                Marryat refers to the Broad Arrow in Ch 3 of The King’s Own

                                “The broad-headed arrow was a mark assumed at the time of the Edwards as distinguishing the property of the King …. Every article supplied to his Majesty’s service is thickly studded with this mark, and to be found in possession of any property so marked is a capital offence”.

                                There is a mention in Holland’s Discourses of the Navy (Navy Records Society) p.238.

                                in reply to: Royal Adelaide #2363
                                Lawrie Phillips
                                Participant

                                  There is a brief entry in Tony Dalton’s British Royal Yachts (Tiverton 2002) and a photograph of a model of the ship which is in the National Maritime Museum.

                                  – Completed December 1833

                                  – Launched on the lake at Virginia Water 13 May 1834

                                  – Copper-bottomed

                                  – Broken-up 1877

                                  – Guns: 22 x 1-pdrs – went to Royal Yacht Squadron at Cowes

                                Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)