The Mariners Mirror Archive

De la Survivance de Traditions Navales Phéniciennes dans la Méditerranée de Nos Jours – ou des Reves a la Réalité (On the Survival of Phoenician Naval Traditions in the Mediterranean of our Days – or on Dreams to Reality)

By Lucien Basch

This article, written in French by a distinguished Belgian nautical archaeologist and historian, is a scathing critique of a number of articles by Lieutenant-Commander A.F. Tilley, in The Mariners Mirror and elsewhere, claiming to discover traces of Phoenician influence on the design of a number of traditional Mediterranean boats.   Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C)
Subjects include: Archaeology | Leisure & Small Craft

Shipbuilding in Sixteenth Century Asunción Del Paraguay

By Adalberto López

The most important shipbuilding centre in south-eastern Spanish South America from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries was Asunción Del Paraguay a thousand miles up the Paraguay River from Buenos Aires. Regional and oceanic commerce generated the demand for vessel construction, while local resources for sail-making, cordage and cables, oakum and pitch for caulking, but […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft | Shipbuilding & Design

Bristol Carpenters’ Nails 1492–1586

By W. L. Goodman

There were seventeen types of handmade nails named in the Bristol Mayors’ accounts.  Unfortunately, the length is not given but can be inferred from the price.  The most common nail was the cawfote, cawfott, calfatte or calfot nail.  Calfatting means caulking but the name may refer to the large nails used to batten the hatches, […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | English Channel
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft | Shipbuilding & Design

The Survival of Ancient Mediterranean Boat Designs

By A. F. Tilley

The sea-going Phoenicians colonised the Mediterranean and Portuguese shores.  From ancient carvings of their boats, it is perhaps possible to recognise modern survivors of those designs. Common characteristics, irrespective of size, are double-ended carvel-built hulls, with conspicuous bow and stern, tilt or turtle canopies, and similar oarage.  Examination of construction, related myths and linguistic characteristics […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Early Middle Ages | Late Middle Ages | Antiquity | High Middle Ages | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Shipwrecks
Subjects include: Archaeology | Leisure & Small Craft | Merchant Marines | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Bumboat

By Edgar K Thompson

The origins of the word bumboat are explored, and the practice of bumboating explained. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft

A Note on South Vietnamese Basket Boats

By Robert F. Cairo

Basket boats, of a great variety of forms and sizes, can be seen on every freshwater of Vietnam. The paper deals on the ones seen by the author in 1969, even he recognizes that he only saw a short sample of all available there. He explains that the most of them are made of bamboo, […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft | Shipbuilding & Design

The Weston-Super-Mare Flatner

By J. G. McKee

The history, design, building and use of these unique coastal craft are looked at in some detail – a plan of a 1903 boat is provided. The Weston flatners appear to be closely related not only to other Somerset craft but also, more intriguingly, to New England wherries and Banks dories with a touch of […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Irish Sea | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft | Shipbuilding & Design | Whaling & Fishing

The Bridgewater Flatner

By Alan Shaw

This short paper describes the design, construction and use of the Bridgewater Flatner, a small double-ended open boat, of either 16 or 19 feet, with an almost flat bottom. The author suggests that the small fore-and-aft camber and thwartship rocker, together with the use of lee-boards instead of a keel, enabled the flatner to be […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft | Shipbuilding & Design

Commercial Sail and Small Fishing Craft of Western South America

By Clinton R. Edwards

Along the coast of Western South America large scale replacement of native watercraft by European and North American types has been accomplished only in the last century. However four of the eight types of craft observed by the first Europeans to make contact with this coast are still in use today. This fascinating variety of […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Pacific
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft

The Sailing Boats of Western Sarawak

By Anthony Richards

The Malays who inhabit the western coast of Sarawak build a variety of small sailing craft for the purposes of trading, fishing and local transport. The methods of construction have been in use for a long time and rely on traditional methods of working local timbers selected for their suitability for different roles in the […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Indian Ocean
Subjects include: Leisure & Small Craft | Shipbuilding & Design

Filter By Subject

Reset