Author Results for Brian Lavery

The Society Annual Lecture 2008: The Sea and British National Identity

By Brian Lavery

The author reflects on the sea and the British national identity by considering the two most recent occasions when Britain was threatened with invasion, by Napoleon and Hitler, dispelling some of the myths and drawing certain conclusions, including his belief that survival has imbued the British with a lasting self-respect. The author seems less concerned […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Napoleonic War | English Channel | North Sea | WW2 | Post WW2
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Navies | Strategy & Diplomacy

The Rebuilding of British Warships 1690 – 1740 Part II

By Brian Lavery

The early eighteenth century saw a shift in British policy from the commissioning of new Navy vessels, to rebuilding the existing fleet. While suiting a conservative national mood, the policy presented practical difficulties by requiring the reshaping of older materials to meet modern design. Polite fictions also arose, such as the breaking up of older […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Spanish Succession | English Channel | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Harbours & Dockyards | Logistics | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

The Rebuilding of British Warships 1690 – 1740 Part I

By Brian Lavery

  This article explores the changing practice of warship rebuilding between 1690 and 1740; focusing on the role of the Navy Board, Admiralty and dockyards in these developments. Different interpretations of the term rebuilding are covered, along with Drummer and Lee’s 1691 definition. Rebuilding was used to modernizing the shape and size of ships. Prior […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Spanish Succession | English Channel | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Harbours & Dockyards | Shipbuilding & Design

The Origins of the 74-Gun Ship

By Brian Lavery

From 1745 – 1822 the two deck 74 was the backbone of the Royal Navy, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars, because of its balance of firepower, sailing qualities and cost. With the development of diagonal bracing in 1811, which minimized hogging, larger ships carrying greater firepower became practical and dominated the early Victorian Navy. Design […] Read More

Filed under: Napoleonic War | Seven Years’ War
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Shipbuilding & Design