Author Results for Christopher Lloyd

Obituary: Captain Alan J. Villiers DSC FRGS

By Christopher Lloyd

Alan Villiers, who died in March 1982, served as the Society’s Chairman from 1960, then President from 1970 to 1974 and a Hon. Vice-President from 1974 to his death. For many years he was Chairman of the Photographic Records Sub-Committee and a member of the H.M.S. Victory Advisory Technical Committee. He went to sea at […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography

Cook and Scurvy

By Christopher Lloyd

This article sets out the protracted history of the adoption of James Lind’s cure for scurvy following its publication in 1753. The author describes how James Cook, although successful in preventing scurvy on his voyages, mistakenly gave the credit to the use of malt. This may have served to delay the large scale use of […] Read More

Filed under: James Cook | Eighteenth Century | Health at Sea | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Science & Exploration

Obituary: Lieutenant-Commander G. P. B. Naish FSA RNR

By Christopher Lloyd

George P. B. Naish, the serving Hon. Secretary of the Society, died in July 1977. He was elected Hon. Secretary in 1947, an office he held for thirty years. It was mainly due to his efforts during these years that the membership of the Society grew significantly. He was constantly concerned for the survival of […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography

Obituary: Paul Johnstone MA FSA FSAScot

By Christopher Lloyd

Paul Johnstone, who died in March 1976, was first elected to the Society’s Council in 1968 and became a Vice-President in 1973. A pioneer of broadcasting, he developed the series ‘Animal, Vegetable, Mineral’, which made archaeology a byword in British households. His involvement in such series as ‘Buried Treasure’, ‘English Castles’ and ‘Advance’ led to […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography

The Mutiny of the Nereide

By Christopher Lloyd

Towards the end of August 1808 the company of the Nereide, a 36-gun frigate cruising the Indian Ocean, mutinied. Initiated in response to the oppressive and violent temperament of Captain Robert Corbet, who was perceived to be abusing the Articles of War, the mutiny was eventually suppressed by Corbet’s threat of shooting the mutineers if […] Read More

Filed under: Napoleonic War | Mutiny & Discipline | Indian Ocean
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

The Royal Naval Colleges at Portsmouth and Greenwich

By Christopher Lloyd

The Naval Academy at Portsmouth was established in 1733. During its 104 years of operation it developed a poor reputation; Lord St. Vincent called it a “sink of vice and abomination…” Closed in 1833, it re-opened in 1837 as an institution of higher education, but rapidly became a place where the students crammed for their […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Administration | Miscellaneous

New Light on the Mutiny at the Nore

By Christopher Lloyd

Letters to his father and brother by A. Hardy, midshipman on board HMS Nassau at Yarmouth, casting new light on the 1797 mutiny are reproduced. They show that Nassau played a more important part in bringing the mutiny at the Nore to an end than had hitherto been suggested. In them Hardy describes, not only […] Read More

Filed under: North Sea | Mutiny & Discipline | French Revolution
Subjects include: Navies

Bartholomew Sharp, Buccaneer

By Christopher Lloyd

The article traces the career and exploits of Bartholomew Sharp after his return from rounding Cape Horn. It references that voyage and provides a description of the literature, commenting on conflicting accounts, suggesting political and personal reasons for the discrepancies. The piece ends with Sharp fading from history although early 21st century scholars claim to […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Other (Early Modern) | Pirates | Caribbean | Pacific
Subjects include: Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers

The Origins of H.M.S. Excellent

By Christopher Lloyd

The article sets to put right an error in the official history of HMS Excellent. It had attributed the establishment of the gunnery school to someone who was not even alive at the time. The credit for an influential pamphlet should have been given to Captain William L Bowles. The article further describes other key […] Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Administration | Navies | Weapons

Dundonald’s Crimean War Plans

By Christopher Lloyd

Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, a forward thinking sailor, inventor and politician, formed the idea of chemical warfare during a visit to sulphur mines in Sicily in 1811. This led to his belief that all fortifications could be subdued by using sulphur fumes under a cover of dense smoke. His proposals and plans of attack […] Read More

Filed under: Crimean War | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Weapons