Author Results for H S Vaughan

The Santo Cristo of Lepanto

By H S Vaughan

The cathedral of Saint Eulalia, Barcelona, contains the great crucifix which is believed to have been carried on the poop of Don Juan’s flagship Real at the Battle of Lepanto, 1571. It is one of the few surviving examples of the sacred emblems that the Christian fleet of the Holy League carried into battle with […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics

Figure-Heads and Beak-Heads of the Ships of Henry VIII

By H S Vaughan

The article takes up a subject touched on in previous articles and correspondence in the Mariner’s Mirror relating to the bows of 16th century warships. From contemporary drawings is observed that both galleases (sail and oar driven) and ships (sail only) had a ram-shaped beak-head but not, on English-built ships, a decorative figure-head. The author […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies | Ship Models & Figureheads | Shipbuilding & Design

The Whipstaff Part I

By H S Vaughan

Here we have some preliminary thoughts on the history of the whipstaff, as a precursor to later articles explaining its development and operation. References to various early descriptions are given, with an attempt at establishing a time-scale for the changes from whipstaff to wheel. Read More

Filed under: Early Middle Ages | Late Middle Ages | High Middle Ages | Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

The Nodal Caravels of 1618

By H S Vaughan

The Nodal brothers voyaged from Lisbon to the Magellen Straits in 1618-19 in two near identical caravels which never parted or lost a single man. The vessels were 80 tons each and carried 40 Portuguese seamen. The caravels were four-masted barquentines, lateen rigged on the three after masts. The article contains a sketch of the […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Other (Early Modern)
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Science & Exploration | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Sew

By H S Vaughan

A number of ‘Notes’ in MM Volume 1 were devoted to establishing the use and origin of the word ‘sew’ and although its usage was believed to have ceased Vaughan confirms that it was still heard on the River Hamble. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: The Use of the Word “Port” with Reference to the Helm

By H S Vaughan

Continuing from his Note in MM Volume 2, Issue 3 Vaughan provides earlier written evidence of the general use of ‘port’ when instructing the helmsman to steer to the left. In his 1644 ‘Seaman’s Dictionary’ Sir H Manwayring states “Port the Helme: Starboard the Helme: termes of Conding: to direct which way the steeresman should […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: A-Cock-Bill

By H S Vaughan

Vaughan provides two examples of where Royal Navy vessels a-cock-billed their yards as an act of respect at two state funerals. The funeral of Dom Carlos, King of Portugal, was probably the last time the Royal Navy performed this function. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies

Note: A-Cock-Bill

By H S Vaughan

Vaughan reproduces a 1669 report by a Mr Gibson on the action between the French frigate Coventry and the similar English vessel Colchester. Colchester came to grief on the o-cock-billed sheat anchor of the Frenchman. Vaughan also seeks clarification from fellow members of the meaning of o-cock-bill and ‘shod’. Read More

Filed under: Dutch Wars | Other (location)
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Navies

Note: W Van de Velde

By H S Vaughan

Vaughan expands on the article in MM Volume 1, Issue 1 concerning the work undertaken by the Van der Veldes on Charles II behalf and introduces a new twist. He points out that one Van der Velde was present when the Dutch ‘cut-out’ the Royal Charles and produced a painting of the event. The painting […] Read More

Filed under: Dutch Wars | North Sea | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Art & Music

Note: The Howland Great Wet Dock

By H S Vaughan

Vaughan provides written evidence that the dock name must have been changed from the above to Greenland dock some time before 1763. Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Harbours & Dockyards