Author Results for John H. Harland

Note: Staghorn

By John H. Harland

The use of the term ‘stag horn’ to describe a mooring bollard Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

The Evolution of the Windlass in the Nineteenth Century

By John H. Harland

The handling of anchor cable on merchant ships was the subject of much innovation in the early nineteenth century. In warships anchor cable was handled by capstans operated by large crews. On merchant ships, with restricted space and manpower, a windlass was preferred. This article examines the development of the hand-powered windlass from the traditional […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Darcy Lever as Inspiration for Jane Austin’s ‘Mr Darcy’

By John H. Harland

A series of conjectures as to whether the actor ‘Mr Darcy’ and Darcy Lever, the author of The Young Sea-Officer’s Sheet Anchor are the same person, the inspiration for one of Jane Austin’s characters. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography

The Design of Winches used at Sea in the 1800s

By John H. Harland

A systematic attempt to answer some questions about ship’s capstans and windlasses during 1750-1850. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Heave a Pawl and Some Related Expressions

By John H. Harland

An examination of the different commands given to achieve the weighing of an anchor from the early 17th century and in many languages. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Sir Robert Sepping’s Topgallant Wedge Fid

By John H. Harland

The use of this innovation is described, and the original correspondence beteween the inventor and the Navy Board outlined. Read More

Filed under: Popular Topics | Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Splicing the Mainbrace

By John H. Harland

An explanation of the use of the expression when an extra issue of spirits was being ordered, and the practical reasons why additional crew would be needed for the manoeuvre. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: The ‘Siding’ of the Bower Anchors

By John H. Harland

An examination of the terms ‘best’ and ‘small’ applied to anchors, with consideration of the need to ride within tidal conditions or a gale. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Victory’s Spritsail Topsail Yard and Dolphin Striker

By John H. Harland

The use on the refitted Victory of a spritsail topsail yard and a dolphin striker together is queried, as the use of one would have compromised the other. Read More

Filed under: Nelson | Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Mizzen Bowlines

By John H. Harland

An explanation of the re-arrangement of the masts of the Victory, showing what effect this had on her sailing qualities, and a request for further elucidation of the meaning and international use of the term ‘mizzen bowlines’ Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

Notre: Piet Heyn and the Early Use of Copper Sheathing

By John H. Harland

In which the user of copper sheathing of ships recommended by the Dutch Admiral was abandoned and taken up by the British. A trial by the frigate Alarm 1761-1765 demonstrated copper was successful in protecting the hull. Among the lessons of the trial – the proper maintenance of the copper to remain effective and the […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

The Early History of the Steering Wheel

By John H. Harland

The use of the wheel to activate a ship’s rudder via the tiller came into use in the early 1700’s, in England, France and later Venetia.  The essential problem was to translate the rotary motion of the rope via the ship’s wheel to a linear one that moved the tiller in an arc. The chronology […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design