Author Results for John Harland

The Lay of Rope

By John Harland

An explanation of the reasons behind the terms ‘right-hand lay’ and ‘left-hand lay’.  The fact that ‘clockwise’, ‘with the sun’ and ‘right-handed’ mean the same thing in the maritime world,  whereas twine direction in nature is almost all right-handed.  The Note moves from hemp to wire rope and the uses to which it will be […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Science & Exploration | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Capstans Handling Chain: Gordon and Barbotin

By John Harland

This note pursues that previously published in MM (99:1) dealing with the transition from hemp to chain. The invention of a chain messenger to be captured by a capstan was claimed by Messrs Gordon and Co in London and by Capitaine Benoit Barbotin in France. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Baron de Bode and His Capstan

By John Harland

The capstan patented in 1836 was designed to be used with a chain messenger by which the               passage of cable was not interrupted.  The Note also contains details of the de Bode family and their historic claim to restitution under the Treaty of Paris for the value of […] Read More

Filed under: Popular Topics | French Revolution | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography | Ship Handling & Seamanship

The Transition from Hemp to Chain Cable: Innovations and Innovators

By John Harland

The advent of chain cable in 1812 resulted in changes in the way ground tackle was handled by the Royal Navy. Ships had to be capable of handling both hemp and chain cable, and the capstan was fitted with sprockets to maintain grip on chains.  Devices to arrest the cable as it ran out were […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Science & Exploration | Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Patent Topgallant and Topmast Fids

By John Harland

A re-visitation of the subject first authoritatively described 30 years ago, in the light of newly available contemporary texts. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design

The Whipstaff

By John Harland

John Harland described the way in which our understanding of the working of the whipstaff has changed over the period of the publication of the Mirror, and outlined the ways in which the whipstaff was used in vessels of steadily increasing size until the value of the lever was outweighed by the method becoming impractical. […] Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Catharpings, Swifters and Bentinck Shrouds

By John Harland

A discussion of technical terms and background of types of rigging details from the age of sail. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Hauling out the Mizzen

By John Harland

The expression ‘hauling out the mizzen’ describes the manoeuvre carried out in 17th century sailing ships which needed to tack. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Hauling out the Mizen

By John Harland

Expert advice has been gathered on sail handling when tacking, and this note discusses also the usefulness of the whipstaff. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Hawser-Laid/Cable-Laid

By John Harland

The significance of the difference in meaning between these two terms, dependent as they are on which side of the Atlantic they are used. English sources make the distinction that hawser-laid ropes are laid right-handed‘with the sun’, while cable-laid are against the sun. In America, cable or hawser laid rope is left-handed rope of nine […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Note: Second Dogwatch: Last Dogwatch.

By John Harland

The tradition of choosing to call the second dog-watch the ‘last dog-watch’ is explored, and the sources of the useage listed. The origins of the expression itself are also examined. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

Note: Steering Sails

By John Harland

A description of the use made of steering sails to increase headway. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship