Author Results for Lucien Basch

Obituary: Peter Throckmorton

By Lucien Basch

Peter Throckmorton, who died in June 1990, was a pioneer in nautical archaeology and took with him a treasure house of knowledge which can never be drawn upon. His achievements included the discovery of the underwater cemetery at Yassi Ada, the wreck of c. 2500 BC near the Greek island of Dhokos and the salvage […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography

The Eleusis Museum Trireme and the Greek Trireme

By Lucien Basch

A comparison of a marble plaque in the Eleusius Museum, the Lenormant relief,  some fourth century coins, the Aquila relief and the Dal Pozzo drawing illustrates development in Greek trireme design. The abandonment of the external struts supporting the outrigger for the upper rowers can be seen as well as the relative position on the […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Art & Music | Navies | Ship Handling & Seamanship | Shipbuilding & Design | Weapons

The Aegina Pirate Ships of c.BC 1700

By Lucien Basch

Basch deduces the origins of shipbuilding in the Bronze Age from models and frescoes. He looks at details of shape, bow decoration, paddles rather than oars, and the probable transport of marine lances as offensive weapons.   He also considers the vessels which were propelled by sails and paddlers rather than oarsmen. These appear to have […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Art & Music | Pirates, Corsairs & Privateers

The Isis of Ptolemy 2 Philadelphus

By Lucien Basch

This article examines a fresco found during 1982 at the Black Sea site of the third century BC city of Nymphaeum. The vessel in question shown in the fresco may have been a “one-off” built for a showing-the-flag mission.   It differs in many respects from the fighting vessels of the times as depicted on contemporary […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Ship Models & Figureheads | Shipbuilding & Design

The Athlit Ram: a Preliminary Introduction and Report

By Lucien Basch

In November 1980, near Athlit south of Haifa, a post-Bronze Age galley ram was discovered with its supporting wooden structure.   At the December 1981 colloquium in Haifa, noted marine archaeologists outlined questions to be answered in subsequent research and conservation on the ram.   The ram, together with its wooden structure, copper nails, and relief emblems, […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Weapons

Carthage and Rome: Tenons and Mortises

By Lucien Basch

Traces the evolution of Roman shipbuilding techniques, from their first maritime expeditions in 394 BC to the onset of the first Punic War in 260 BC highlighting the Roman adoption of construction using tenons and mortises, which allowed for rapid building of a fleet. Using literature and archaeological evidence it is shown that this technique […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

The Kadirga Revisited: a Preliminary Re-Appraisal

By Lucien Basch

Tradition dates the last remaining preserved galley, the Kadirga in Instanbul Maritime Museum, to the reign of Mehmet II who died in 1481. In a previous Note (MM 60, 133-134) this author had queried this early date. Having since revisited the ship and also discovered a 17th century Dutch print which appears to show the […] Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

The Metal Sheathing of Roman Warships

By Lucien Basch

An earlier article by L. Casson (MM 64, 139-142) concluded that while Roman fishing boats were sheathed, warships were not. The reason given was that fishing boats spent longer periods in the water than warships. In this article the author presents iconographic evidence from portraits of ships on mosaic tiles at the baths at Thermetra […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Le Navire Mnš et Autres Notes de Voyage en Egypte

By Lucien Basch

Under Ramses II and III (c.1200 BC) the Egyptians used a type of merchant ship called a mnš which, although built in their own shipyards, appear to have been of Syrian design.  Ship graffiti and stone anchors found at Karnak point to a greater complexity in the design development of these vessels but unfortunately they […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Archaeology | Shipbuilding & Design

De la Survivance de Traditions Navales Phéniciennes dans la Méditerranée de Nos Jours – ou des Reves a la Réalité (On the Survival of Phoenician Naval Traditions in the Mediterranean of our Days – or on Dreams to Reality)

By Lucien Basch

This article, written in French by a distinguished Belgian nautical archaeologist and historian, is a scathing critique of a number of articles by Lieutenant-Commander A.F. Tilley, in The Mariners Mirror and elsewhere, claiming to discover traces of Phoenician influence on the design of a number of traditional Mediterranean boats.   Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean | Other (Twentieth C)
Subjects include: Archaeology | Leisure & Small Craft

A Galley in Istanbul: The Kadirga

By Lucien Basch

A description of the galley Kadirga , located in the Maritime Museum of Istanbul, with the consideration of the state and provenance. It was preserved, in 1972, in a building containing other caiques of the Sultans’ collections. The paper is accompanied by a set of 19th century drawings and photographs taken by the author. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration

Phoenician Oared Ships Part II

By Lucien Basch

In the second part of his study about the origin of the ancient trieres, Basch presents evidence concerning rigging, hull decoration and iconography, testifying that the very first appearance of the ancient trieres must be attributed to Phoenician culture. Further, he deeply analyzes the evolution of this boat-type, suggesting some interesting technical parallels between Phoenician […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Shipbuilding & Design

Phoenician Oared Ships Part I

By Lucien Basch

Greek trieres have been well documented but little is known of those of other states of antiquity. Here Basch argues that Phoenician galleys evolved differently from those of Greece. Five points differentiate the Phoenician vessel: protective shields along its sides; an upper deck; a widened hull with ‘encorbellements’; an absence of wales and the shape […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

A Model of an Ancient Warship in the Louvre

By Lucien Basch

Models of ancient warships, particularly in the era from classical Greece to the end of the Roman Empire are rare, as are monuments depicting them. With this model, not previously described, the author attempts a detailed analysis with drawings, concluding that the model is Italic, probably a trireme, from the period 350-200BC. It provides many […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Ship Models & Figureheads | Shipbuilding & Design