Author Results for R Morton Nance

Stone-carved Ships in Brittany

By R Morton Nance

The number of stone-carved ships found in Brittany is second only to Holland: it represents Breton piety in contrast to the Dutch portrayal of prosperity.   The author’s ten sketches of granite ship carvings surviving in church walls are supplemented by seventeen more sketches by his local advisers. He does not claim that carvings in granite […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Other (Early Modern)
Subjects include: Ship Models & Figureheads

Terradas and Talismans

By R Morton Nance

The article examines an illustration of a ship in Jeddah made in 1795 in order to identify and explain features owing their origin to older Oriental practice as well as some that reflect western influence. Archaic Oriental features include, inter alia, a steering arrangement using yoke lines attached to a beam as well as decorations […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Indian Ocean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Caravels

By R Morton Nance

Here is an article in which the author has drawn twenty-six caravels, taken from early documents, and goes on to describe their construction, masts and rigging in a comparative way, in order to assist in removing some of the confusion that exists between caravels and carvels, which were simply large carvel-built fishing boats. Read More

Filed under: English Channel | High Middle Ages | North Sea | Irish Sea | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Some Old Time Ship Pictures Part IV A Group of Florentines

By R Morton Nance

Another in this series of analyses of early ship illustrations, these from the fifteenth century, in which the author discusses the hull construction, the masts and rigging with the intention of demonstrating the value of such illustrations to naval historians. Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | Other (Early Modern) | Mediterranean
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

A Hanseatic Bergentrader of 1489

By R Morton Nance

The Hansard ports of the Fifteenth Century had the best found fleets of merchant ships in Northern Europe. A painted panel in the Marienkirche of Lubeck contains a representation of these vessels. Much detail of the ‘cage work ‘ of the fore and aft castles is shown as are ports in each of the castles. […] Read More

Filed under: Baltic | High Middle Ages
Subjects include: Historic Vessels, Museums & Restoration | Merchant Marines | Ship Models & Figureheads | Shipbuilding & Design

Ketches

By R Morton Nance

There are indications that the origin of the word ketch is from the Levant, but the appearance of the word ‘cache’ in the fifteenth century applied to a cargo boat seems to justify the assumption that the word is, after all, English. Early representations demonstrate a variety of two-masted rigs with a main and mizzen […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Early Chainwales

By R Morton Nance

Morton Nance seeks to clarify the differences apparent in Early Modern illustrations of the fitting of chainwales to ships’ sides. To support his proposition he provides copies of drawings of such fittings from the period. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Snow

By R Morton Nance

Morton Nance compares and contrasts the ‘snow’ with the French ‘langar(d)’. He takes as his sources a number of French publications from the late Eighteenth century. (See also MM Volume 2, Issue 8). Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Top Men

By R Morton Nance

From contemporary sources Morton Nance seeks to explain how the size of Tudor trading vessels could be differentiated by the use of the term ‘topmen’. These were ships of between 40 and 100 tons burthen and carried a topsail above the main sail. At St Ives this additional sail carried a financial penalty when loading […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Top Men

By R Morton Nance

From contemporary sources Morton Nance seeks to explain how the size of Tudor trading vessels could be differentiated by the use of the term ‘topmen’. These were ships of between 40 and 100 tons burthen and carried a topsail above the main sail. At St Ives this additional sail carried a financial penalty when loading […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

A Trader and a Man-of-War Late XIV Century

By R Morton Nance

The illustrations of the late fourteenth century Livres de Mervailles in the French Biblioteque Nationale show fantastically imaged Oriental and European ships, but also some reasonable specimens including the representation of a trading ship and a man of war carrying crusaders to the Holy Land in northern, rather than Mediterranean, ships of the fourteenth century. […] Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music

Note: Dutch Gable Stones

By R Morton Nance

The drawing by Morton Nance was reproduced from a photograph by Commander D. Wilson Barker RNR and shows the gable of the Skipper’s Guild building in Brussels which depicts the decorated stern of a ship. Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Art & Music | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Timmynoggy & Vargord

By R Morton Nance

Morton Nance expands on his note in MM Volume 1, Issue 6. Additional information gleaned from Cornish fishermen is provided, along with linguistic connections to Brittany. Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship

Dutch Gable Stones

By R Morton Nance

In the early 17 Century the citizens of Holland used the outer front gable stones of their homes to establish their place in society.  This was especially so with seafarers and notably owners of merchant shipping.  The decorations used were their Coats of Arms,  dates,  but more importantly carvings of their ships. These carvings indicate […] Read More

Filed under: North Sea | Other (Early Modern)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Timmy Noggy and Vargord

By R Morton Nance

Morton Nance explains the meaning and history of the two Cornish seafaring phrases ‘timmy noggy’, a rope secured so as to stop the fore sheets dropping down between the anchor and ships side, and ‘vargord’, a spar which served instead of a bowline and pushed the fore leech of the sail forward. Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship