Author Results for S Goodwin

Note: Popular Nautical Language

By S Goodwin

The author comments on the nautical origin of a number of commonly used phrases, for example “three sheets in the wind”, which he surmises was a comment on the ability of the helmsman, and “to be at loggerheads with”. This he assumes originated from the name of a round-shot on the end of an iron […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Twentieth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous

Note: Decks and their Definitions

By S Goodwin

Goodwin comments on the conflicting use of quarter deck and half-deck in Marryat’s “The King’s Own” which was published in 1830. Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: Galley

By S Goodwin

Goodwin provides written evidence of the use of the name ‘galley’ for the cook room of men-of-war prior to the date claimed by Sir R. Massie Blomfield (MM Volume 1, Issue 6). Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Manpower & Life at Sea

Note: The Bourges Lift

By S Goodwin

Goodwin continues to seek to clarify the workings of the rigging depicted in Brindley’s MM Volume 1, Issue 5 article concerning the accompanying ship depictions. (See also the earlier ‘Note’ in this issue by Goodwin on Medieval Ships). Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music

Note: Medieval Ships

By S Goodwin

Goodwin seeks to clarify some of the layout of the rigging portrayed in an illustration which accompanied H H Brindley‘s article ‘Mediæval Ships in Painted Glass and on Seals’ in MM Volume 1, Issue 5. Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music

Note: A Fifteenth Century Trader

By S Goodwin

Goodwin takes issue with Morton Nance concerning his interpretation of a ship drawing in MM Volume 1, Issue 3. He questions his assumption as to the type of vessel and the claim that the poop was supported by stanchions. Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music | Shipbuilding & Design

Note: To Sew

By S Goodwin

The verb “to sew”, when referring to a ship, meant ‘to go dry’ but appeared to be obsolete by 1911. Goodwin relates his conversations at that time with a number of seafarers in Kent, with the older ones remembering the phrase but younger men having no recollection of its use. Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Twentieth C)
Subjects include: Ship Handling & Seamanship