Author Results for W. Salisbury

Early Tonnage Measurement in England: Part V Colliers, Deadweight, and Displacement Tonnage

By W. Salisbury

The discussion on early tonnage measurement, started in M.M. 52 and 53, continues with a discussion on the peculiarities of the English coal trade; a cargo normally measured by weight not volume. Coal was the most common English deadweight cargo. Its measures predate that of wine, the eventual most common measure for both weight and […] Read More

Filed under: High Middle Ages | North Sea | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Miscellaneous | Shipbuilding & Design

Early Tonnage Measurement in England Part IV Rules Used by Shipwrights and Merchants

By W. Salisbury

The fourth in the series, this article examines the plethora of rules used by shipwrights and merchants to calculate tonnage in England between the adoption of Baker’s Rule in 1605 and the Commissions and Acts that created commonality in the mid nineteenth century. It seeks to distinguish between those proposed and those actually were used […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | East India Company | Other (location)
Subjects include: Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Early Tonnage Measurement in England Part III HM Customs and Statutory Rules

By W. Salisbury

The third in a series, this article examines the rules used by HM Customs established through Statute to calculate tonnage following 1670 Act for ‘Encouragement of the Building of Good and Defensible Ships’ to the adoption of the Moorsom System in the 1854 Merchant Shipping Act. It focuses on the 1671 Book of Rates, 1709 […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Administration | Merchant Marines | Shipbuilding & Design

Early Tonnage Measurement in England: Part II Rules for Ships Built for and Hired by the Navy

By W. Salisbury

The numerous wars fought by Britain between the 15th century and the 19th century required rules of measurement of tonnage both for construction of naval ships and for hiring merchant ships. Beginning with the “Baker” rule prior to 1628 and extending to 1872 the author provides an extensive and exhaustive review of the variations in […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

A Draught of a Jacobean Three Decker, the Prince Royal

By W. Salisbury

Launched in 1610, the Prince Royal 55 guns, was built at Woolwich by Phineas Pett and rebuilt there in 1641. She was captured and burnt by the Dutch 13 June 1666 during the Four Day Battle. In this article the author suggests that a ‘mutilated pencil drawing’ in the National Maritime Museum’s plans collection (HIS0098) […] Read More

Filed under: Dutch Wars | Other (location)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design

The Woolwich Ship

By W. Salisbury

Though the story of the unearthing (1912) of the Woolwich Ship has been told by Dr. R.C. Anderson (Mariner’s Mirror May 1959), until now its identification remained a mystery. Based on existing evidence, including the author’s reconstruction of a portion of the ship’s hull, the author concludes that the wreck is the Sovereign. The Sovereign […] Read More

Filed under: Tudors | Shipwrecks | Internal Waterways
Subjects include: Archaeology | Harbours & Dockyards | Shipbuilding & Design

Hollow Waterlines and Early Clippers

By W. Salisbury

Responding to Col Ewart’s article on ‘Scottish Maid’ (MM 1943/2) when is a clipper not a clipper?’ this article lists definitions and published sources. There is a plea that ship plans and models should be copied and collated centrally by the Society’s Coastal Craft Committee for future reference. Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Other (Nineteenth C)
Subjects include: Shipbuilding & Design