Author Results for W.G. Perrin

The Prime Meridian

By W.G. Perrin

Why did Greenwich become the datum point for the measurement of longitude and what meridians were used before it? The earliest meridians were the product of mapping the world, initially by Eratosthenes.   Ptolemy attempted to establish a prime meridian through the Canary Islands being the most westerly land known.   Through the 16th century most maps […] Read More

Filed under: Antiquity | Other (Early Modern) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Internal Waterways | Other (location)
Subjects include: Science & Exploration

Notes on the Development of Bands in the Royal Navy Part VI (cont) Half Measures

By W.G. Perrin

In November, I884, H.R.H. The Duke of Edinburgh (then in command of the Channel Squadron) put forward certain proposals for the improvement of the position, prospects, and training of the C.S. Bandsmen in the Navy. Sir G.T Phipps Hornby, in a letter setting forth his’ opinions on the Duke of Edinburgh’s proposals, laid stress upon […] Read More

Filed under: English Channel | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music | Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

Notes on the Development of Bands in the Royal Navy Part IV Introduction of Band Ratings

By W.G. Perrin

The “Musician ” was a single-station billet, one only being allowed to each ship of all classes. The first real step towards the formation of a regular band was the introduction in October, 1847, of the rating of “Bandsman ” with pay of £1 14s. a month. The distinction between ” musician ” and ” […] Read More

Filed under: Mediterranean | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Navies

Notes on the Development of Bands in the Royal Navy Part III Unofficial Bands

By W.G. Perrin

There was no uniformity to bands, some were unofficial, with bandsmen paid from the pockets of Admiral or Captain.  Nelson appreciated the value of music on board.  The routine on one ship is described:  ‘At 2 o’clock a band of music plays till within a quarter to 3, when the drum beats the tune ” […] Read More

Filed under: Napoleonic War
Subjects include: Administration | Battles & Tactics | Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

Notes on the Development of Bands in the Royal Navy Part II The Decline and Fall of the Trumpeter

By W.G. Perrin

The Royal Navy reduced the importance of the trumpeter onboard, while reducing his rate of pay.  His role was replaced  by that of the drummer. Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Art & Music

Pellew and the Departure of the Bantry Expedition; December 1796

By W.G. Perrin

In December 1796 a watch was being kept on the French fleet at Brest by Admiral Colpoys with a squadron of 15 sail of the line detached from the Grand Fleet, which lay at Spithead. An inshore squadron of 4 frigates under Commodore Sir Edward Pellew was tasked to sight the Brest Roads daily and […] Read More

Filed under: English Channel | French Revolution
Subjects include: Battles & Tactics | Navies

Pellew and the Departure of the Bantry Expedition

By W.G. Perrin

It had been known for some months that a military expeditionary force was being organised in Brest under General Hoche and there was great uncertainty as to its probable destination; India, the West Indies, Ireland and Portugal were all possible. The Indefatigable” carried lights at each masthead and topsail yardarms, fired guns, burnt blue lights […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Archaeology | Harbours & Dockyards | Navies

Early Naval Ordnance

By W.G. Perrin

This article transcribes information gleaned from a document dated 17th July 1585, in which Francis Drake lists the ordnance and ordnance stores received to equip the ships Bonaventure and Aid. Charts itemize the numbers and weight of guns for each ship, and the ordnance stores for each, listing stores both by the type of cannon […] Read More

Filed under: Atlantic | Tudors | Francis Drake | The Armada
Subjects include: Logistics | Navies | Weapons

The Diary of Henry Teonge Part II

By W.G. Perrin

The Captain tells us he is delayed waiting for the merchantmen to finish loading, but does not mention the visit of the “cheife Caddee” and the “Gaw,” nor any of the other events recorded by Teonge until 13th November, when he records the loss of 2 English and 2 other ships taken by the Tripoleans. […] Read More

Filed under: North Sea | Other (Early Modern) | Mediterranean | Other (location)
Subjects include: Merchant Marines

The Diary of Henry Teonge Part I

By W.G. Perrin

Further to the author’s earlier queries about the diary of Henry Teonge, and pending the production of the original manuscript as a result of enquiries set on foot by Sir John Laughton, this note compares the printed book with the existing Admiralty Records relating to the ships in which Teonge served, finding a number of […] Read More

Filed under: North Sea | Other (Early Modern) | Mediterranean | Other (location)
Subjects include: Biography | Manpower & Life at Sea | Navies

British Naval Ensigns

By W.G. Perrin

Article is a historical survey of the use of ensigns by British naval ships. Covers the development of their use and design from 16th century; the use of red, white and blue distinguishing colours; changing designs in the canton; addition of the Red St George’s cross to the white ensign and the final change in […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Early Modern) | Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (Eighteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Miscellaneous | Navies

The Union Flag

By W.G. Perrin

Why is the Union Flag commonly called the Union Jack? The answer is to be found in the Stuart proclamations that governed the introduction and use of the Union Flag, which provided that the King’s ships were to fly the Union Flag on their bowsprit, i.e. as a jack. In 1833 an Admiralty Circular erroneously […] Read More

Filed under: Other (Nineteenth C) | Other (location)
Subjects include: Navies