The National Maritime Museum’s new photography exhibition – ‘Exposure: Lives at Sea’

November 2020

Dr Sam Willis visits the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London to explore their new photography exhibition. Exposure: Lives at Sea was brought together during the UK’s COVID-19 lockdown. It is the first exhibition curated by Laura Boon, the Lloyd’s Register Foundation Public Curator for Contemporary Maritime. The importance of seafarers has been brought into sharp focus during the Covid pandemic. Seafarers are keyworkers have helped keep our supermarkets stocked, and yet hundreds of thousands of them have been stranded at sea. This exhibition is designed to bring recognition to the important role seafarers play in the modern world and explores many themes with both contemporary and historical relevance. In this socially distanced, visually-led exhibition, the experience of work and play at sea is displayed through the lens of six seafarers and researchers – from the large-scale panoramic to the intensely intimate – bringing together photography taken around the world, from the reefs of Mexico to the isolation of Antarctica, to document the myriad ways life can be spent at sea. We rely on our oceans for food, ecosystem services, energy and transportation, yet it is a world rarely seen – making this exhibition both striking and important.

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    Sam Willis

    From the Society for Nautical Research, I’m Sam Willis, and this is the Mariner’s Mirror Podcast, the world’s number one podcast dedicated to all of maritime history. It’s the 30th of November, this continues our series of excerpts from the logbook of the Whaler Swan, of Hull, from 1836. She’s trapped in the ice in the Davis Strait between Baffin Island and the west coast of Greenland. The thermometer is dropping, and they’re starting to burn bits of their own ship to keep warm

    Whaler Swan

    Tuesday 29th November, clear weather but intensely cold, the thermometer being of no use the quicksilver sunk into the bowl. This is the coldest day we have had yet, and we feel it very much. Replenished the oil cask this day with 22 gallons of neat oil and mizzen top gallent mast also cut up for fuel.

    Sam Willis

    Logbooks like this have helped us understand that arctic air temperatures are currently rising at twice the global average rate. As the Greenland ice sheet melts, so the global sea level rises.

    Hello everyone, today I’m in wonderful Greenwich at the National Maritime Museum to see their new contemporary maritime photography exhibition. It’s called ‘Exposure: Lives at Sea’, and it deals with some heavy weight issues. We rely on our oceans for food, ecosystem, services, energy and transportation but it’s a world rarely seen. To open this up the National Maritime Museum have created this exhibition in which the experience of work and play at sea will be explored through the lenses of six seafarers and researchers. The photographs vary from the large scale panoramic to the intensely intimate and bring together photography taken from all over the world from the reefs of Mexico to the isolation of Antarctica, and they documented the myriad ways that life can be spent at sea. Perceptions of the sea often recall historical rather than contemporary realities, but the two of course, are essentially intertwined. You can see important themes such as isolation and camaraderie, science and survival, climate change and conservation, and the lived experiences of men and women whilst they are at sea. Commercial Fisherman Corey Arnold is one, his photographs contrast the icy cold of the Alaskan sea with the warmth of the camaraderie amongst the seafarers with which he lives on board. In Scotland, Peter Ian Campbell specifically trained to work on oil rigs in order to capture the unique experiences of the people working there, and he reveals those human stories of people working in one of the most challenging environments on Earth. Michal Krzysztofowicz, his photography captures isolation and one of the most remote places on Earth: the British Antarctic Survey’s Halley VI Research Station. It also tells a touching story of how he remained close to his partner during this separation. Cezar Gabriel is a seafarer and photographer who spent an additional three months at sea in 2020, unable to dock in Brazil due to the Coronavirus pandemic. Physical and mental challenges of life at sea are beautifully displayed through his photographs. Jennifer Adler, a conservation photographer and underwater journalist, shows us an uncharted world beneath the surface and through her, we explore how best we can protect that environment. In Mexico, Octavio Aburto uses his photography to question how you can balance eco-tourism and development. Anyway, it’s enough from me, I think it’s time I took you into the exhibition to meet the curator behind this all, the excellent Laura Boon. She is the Lloyd’s Register Foundation Public Curator for Contemporary Maritime at the Royal Museums in Greenwich. I’m here with Laura Boon at this wonderful new exhibition, there’s some dramatic footage going on from the top of a container ship there, which is something you see as soon as you walk in. It’s a fantastic idea this, it’s something that really strikes a chord with me because I’ve spent so much of my time at sea. What was the thinking behind the project?

    Laura Boon

    I think the thinking behind it was that so often when we talk about maritime, we talk about big numbers. So, we talk about 60,000 ships at sea, or 85% of all of our trade coming by sea and the kind of people behind it are a little bit obscured by that. So, the aim of the exhibition was really to kind of people maritime, as it were, and find a little bit about the lives of those people that are still working at sea today.

    Sam Willis

    How did you source these people? How did you track them down, make your shortlist?

    Laura Boon

    It’s not very glamorous, I’m afraid, it was a lot of time spent on Google and reading articles. One of our photographers, Ceszr, we even found on Facebook through the Facebook group that he ran. So, because of some of our photographers not being so well known, though, it did take a little bit of time just to find them through lots of keyword searches.

    Sam Willis

    How many photographers do you have?

    Laura Boon

    So, there’s six photographers in the exhibition, and all of them represent a slightly different view and a slightly different sector of maritime.

    Sam Willis

    Have you got a favourite one?

    Laura Boon

    No.

    Sam Willis

    Well, I tell you what, let’s have, let’s walk over here. Let’s start over here because this looks fascinating. So, Laura, who have we got here?

    Laura Boon

    So here we have Mich, who was a Data Manager with the British Antarctic Survey, and Mich set himself the challenge that every day he would take at least one photograph he posted on a blog. So, he was posted at the Halley Research Station. And during the nine months of the winter season, it has a crew of just 13 people. So, this is very much kind of documenting his life as part of that team.

    Sam Willis

    Yeah, and you get a sense of – it’s a funny mixture, isn’t it of being isolated, but also being surrounded by penguins, primarily? But also, you know, comrades, isn’t it?

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, definitely. And I think through Mich’s photography really, this sense of community comes out. And it’s so important, that obviously being such a small team, and so, so isolated, that they kind of get on well, and you can see how they, in their downtime, kind of entertain themselves, and also how they stay connected back to home and the people that they’ve left behind.

    Sam Willis

    Let’s go and have a look at this image here where you’ve got a… what have we got here? We’ve got a lady in a swimming cap with her arms, is that a swimming cap with her arms raised?

    Laura Boon

    I think it’s a very colourful woolly hat, and maybe some ski goggles on top. So, this is actually their ‘Fake-mas Day’. So due to the arrival of supplies coming, they weren’t able to celebrate Christmas Day on the day itself, so they celebrated a Fake-mass, which some of us might be doing this year as well, a few days later. But the first supply planes came so they were interrupted from their festivities and this is actually the station manager and she had to kind of do some air traffic control and bring the supply aeroplane in and she didn’t have time to kind of change into her more usual cold-weather gear.

    Sam Willis

    Not dressed appropriately for what for being at the ends of the earth. There’s a lovely picture next to it here as well. This one I particularly like, so we’ve got – what is going on here?

    Laura Boon

    This is one of the images that I think kind of surprises you. It seems a little bit out of, out of place, as it were. And it shows two people in kind of bright orange prison-style jumpsuits, and then one of them’s up against the height board, holding up a sign from Halley prison. And this isn’t actually reflection on, well, maybe it is, on their feelings of being stuck there. But every year, it’s all of the different stations, even though there are 1000s of miles apart in some cases, do a film competition between the different stations, and this is just a still from their film.

    Sam Willis

    It’s a fake of an ID photograph that’s taken when you’re arrested. And what they’ve done cleverly is they’ve turned their whiteboard into the height board with black strips going and I get so you can see how high they are. This is Ross Saunders, who’s holding up

    Laura Boon

    A teaboy, a teaspoon, sorry, teaspoon boy Saunders. And yeah, I think it gives a really great sense of just the kind of the fun and joy that they have. So that although they’re very, very isolated, I mean, you would have to find ways to entertain yourselves.

    Sam Willis

    I think you would and that’s so true for so much of the maritime world of maritime history. Let’s wander off, come on.

    So, this takes this idea of isolation a bit further, because they’re not just isolated, they’re stationary as well, which is really disappointing. If you’re going to be at sea, you’re isolated and your stationery, that’s right everyone, we’re looking at images taken from an oil rig. Where is this one in particular?

    Laura Boon

    So, these are in the North Sea oil fields? So, Peter Iain Campbell, actually started off as a photographer, was very interested in finding out more about the oil industry being based up in Scotland. It’s kind of on the periphery, but it is still this very hidden world, it’s obviously taking place hundreds of miles offshore. So, he took the decision to self-fund his offshore training and be employed on an oil rig in order so that he can document what life was like onboard. And it was actually about three months from getting his first job, and like any of us, he was kind of taking that time to learn the ropes, find his feet, before he actually took his first photograph. And you’ll notice that all of these photographs are square, he actually shoots in film, which is partly a stylistic thing, but also a practical thing that it meant that he then didn’t need a permit to having a piece of electrical equipment on the rigs.

    Sam Willis

    And there’s a wonderful variety of images of the rigs themselves makes you wonder how he took those he’s on the must be on the bridge of a very large ship.

    Laura Boon

    So, the ones that you can see at the top, which are the external shots of the rigs, which is very unusual to get, you can see that they’re rusted, they’re decayed, these aren’t necessarily the images of the oil industry wants to portray. These are actually taken from the supply vessels. So, he no longer actually works out on the rigs, and instead, he joins the supply vessels. So crew are flown out to the rigs on helicopters, which is really expensive, all kind of food and equipment, and goes out by kind of small boat. So, he now joins these boats. And it means that he’s able to get these really unusual external shots, including the final shot that actually just shows that the leftover concrete legs of a decommissioned oil rig, and that’s something that he looks at in his work is

    Sam Willis

    This is a particularly beautiful photograph, actually, isn’t it? Because it shows the legs, the foundations of the oil rig, but they’re exactly at the same height as the horizon. So, what you’ve got is just a gap, an absence of where there might have been something at one time. It makes you think as well about the history of these things. You know, it’s when you do see contemporary oil rigs like this it immediately makes you, kind of plants you there and makes you, wonder about what life is like there. But then at the same time, you know, they’ve been doing it for generations, haven’t they.

    Laura Boon

    And something that Peter Iain talks about in his work, and his motivation, is he sees this as a historical record that he’s taking now. So, a lot of these oil rigs are being considered for decommissioning, the oil fields themselves maturing, as we move away from fossil fuels, so this is him kind of capturing this, this moment in time as it were, as it begins to change.

    Sam Willis

    Oh, I love that. I love that. History happening in front of your eyes. And now this, this is something completely different.

    Laura Boon

    So here we have Dr. Jennifer Adler’s work. She started off as an academic, she was studying freshwater biology. And I think her motivation perhaps was realizing that a lot of people just really don’t understand the underwater world, although we’re kind of very reliant on it for what we refer to as eco-services, actually our understanding of it is very, very low. So, once she finished her PhD, she decided to start documenting science happening. So, in front of us we have wonderful pictures of coral reef study and restoration. And also, some images that I always feel are quite kind of Bond girl-esque with the spear guns, collecting small fish to study them. But it’s her kind of opening up this world that otherwise, we wouldn’t see of science in action, as it were.

    Sam Willis

    I love this one in the middle. Let’s just back up here and have a look at this one. So, it looks like three antlers of a tiny reindeer. But actually, they’re pieces of coral and they’re being, they’re tiny, there’s three, they’re the size of a finger. And they’re being tagged with cable ties. And you just get a sense of how minute and how careful is the care of these coral reefs; how specific and tiny it needs to be in focus

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, so it’s really methodical work. So, they’ve had to drill into the seabed itself to make a little space for the coral, it’s then implanted. And as you say they then using cable ties, which come to the rescue on all occasions, to just secure it in these photos are referred to as coral reef gardeners. I mean, do you really get a sense that as you say they’re just really meticulously restoring damaged areas of reef. And this has been a kind of ground-breaking project in the Florida Keys that is now being replicated worldwide because as we know that there’s unfortunately huge areas of coral reef that become degraded. So, one thing that people are looking at is if it’s possible to restore them in this manner.

    Sam Willis

    The only thing I can compare it with, like through the scale of it, is maybe giving someone a hair transplant, strand by strand, except you’re trying to cover the entirety of this coral reef with pieces of coral. It’s so admirable. And again, it makes you, all of these cutting-edge images of what’s happening now what is happening right now with the planet, makes you think about how other people have spent their time underwater in the past.

    Laura Boon

    And if it wasn’t for these photographs, it’s just something that we wouldn’t be able to see.

    Sam Willis

    Absolutely. Right, let’s go explore more. This is so much fun, what’s around the corner? Now, let’s have a look at this image here. It’s great because it’s an aerial photograph, it’s taken from above, isn’t it, taken from the bridge of a ship looking down on the deck, and there are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 men in curious poses in water. And I think what they’ve done is it’s baking hot wherever they are, and they flooded the deck to create a swimming pool.

    Laura Boon

    Yeah! So, this photo is taken in the Atlantic Ocean. And I think it’s one of the works that at first kind of attracted me to Cezar’s project because it’s just so striking, it takes you a little while to work out what’s going on. But yeah, it’s a hot sunny day and to kind of cool off and relax they’ve flooded the deck, as it were, to make this rather impromptu swimming pool.

    Sam Willis

    It’s something that speaks of time being spent at sea. When you think of sailors doing their sailory stuff, it’s only a fraction of the time isn’t it, they’ve got huge expanses of time that needs to be filled. They’re often doing work, but there is leisure as well, isn’t there?

    Laura Boon

    Yes, and Cezar talks about the importance of it, the photo is called ‘Blowing off Steam’, but this importance of kind of relaxing. Lots of their jobs are very kind of pressurised, very time-sensitive, they’ve got a lot of responsibility on their shoulders, so getting together as a crew and just enjoying themselves and relaxing is extremely important for their well-being.

    Sam Willis

    They’re genuinely relaxing here, whereas, in the photograph behind, one of them is covered in honey and jam, I think, isn’t it? So, this is enjoyable relaxation, and this is something that has an ancient history, isn’t it? What we’re looking at here?

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, so the photos you’re referring to are a set that look at ‘Crossing the Line’, which is an ancient tradition that seafarers still observe today to celebrate crossing the equator. So, for a seafarer whose first time it is, he’s set kind of challenges by Neptune, he’s tested by the devil: we have a photograph of the devil on board that ship who appears to have a wig made out of a mop, perhaps.

    Sam Willis

    What do you reckon his horns are made out of? I can’t work that out.

    Laura Boon

    They look almost wooden and then he’s got a kind of papier-mache like, kind of pig snout. And once upon a time crossing the line could actually be quite a brutal thing on a ship, especially on very young crew members, in some cases, it’s almost like hazing. Whereas now although they’ve kept the traditions of the kind of mythology behind it, you still have representations of Neptune, God of the sea, it has softened a little bit. So, we do have our crew member made to crawl through some sort of cylinder. But instead of actual oil, they’ve made up a concoction of kind of tomato ketchup, honey, I think there’s some chocolate spread in there, I think they’ve put a little, maybe a bit too much ketchup in this mix, because it’s quite red, it looks almost blood-like. And then the final image we have someone,

    Sam Willis

    Well, let me just say that a critic would say – actually no, completely the other way around. A positive person would say that this man has a one-man jacuzzi. He has a solo jacuzzi. A critic would say that he’s standing up in a wheelie bin full of water.

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, and so, or in symbolism, he’s bathing three times in seawater.

    Sam Willis

    I see.

    Laura Boon

    But it’s obviously quite, it’s probably quite, practical as well if you’ve just crawled through a rather sticky mess of honey and all sorts. But yeah, so that’s the final part is this kind of idea of sea baptism. It’s wonderful to see that it’s, as a tradition, still continuing today. And I think for seafarers, kind of marking these occasions at sea are really important, both to kind of break up the journey, but also to really build that sense of community.

    Sam Willis

    And it is an international community, isn’t it? We’re looking at faces from all over the world here. And although there are 5 men here, but there are you know, it’s very much balanced between men and women.

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, definitely. So, Cezar himself is Romanian, but he does spend most of his time off the coast of Brazil now, but during his career he has travelled all across the world.

    Sam Willis

    Let’s have a look at these remarkable ones behind us here. It’s a lovely quote, actually behind it: ‘Photography is a very good way to convince decision-makers to change their perspectives in favour of the environment.’ And, you know, here are eight photographs, which very much support that, don’t they?

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, so Dr. Octavio Aburto, is an academic, he spent his kind of life committed to promoting sustainable fishing and marine protected areas. But he sees his photography as a way of, as you say, really changing people’s opinions. He’s really committed to the idea that if you show people the underwater world, they will understand it more and hopefully, be encouraged to protect it.

    Sam Willis

    I love that actually, I reckon if you show pictures, people pictures of the underwater world, they understand it less, which makes them want to understand it more. I mean, this picture of someone swimming amongst 50,000 fish.

    Laura Boon

    Yeah. And so, what’s incredible about the image in front of us, with all of the fish, is that this is taken from a marine protected area. And around 20 years ago, this was an area with very few fish, it had been completely overfished. Although there was still some commercial fishing continuing, it was becoming really unprofitable. And the community and the decision-makers made the difficult decision to actually stop fishing, which hurt them financially short term, but now as you can see, the area has recovered to an amazing extent. And there’s some kind of community fishing that occurs, but also there’s lots of kind of ecotourism. So, it does show really kind of hopeful idea in there as well, that through marine protected areas we can kind of protect and also regenerate areas.

    Sam Willis

    A real contrast to the sort of the beauty of it is the visceral reality of fishing. And here, we’re looking at an image of four yellow legs. So, the two men, you can’t see their feet because they are covered in guts of fish, and there’s blood, just everywhere, what’s going on there?

    Laura Boon

    And so, I think this is showing the reality of fishing. I really love this image just for the kind of the contrast of the colours and the brightness of the images. But I think it was really important for us that we’re also sharing the reality of people in their day-to-day life. And sometimes when we show subjects like community fishing, they can be slightly posed photos, or sometimes the blood and the gore, as it were, gets kind of edited out and we didn’t want to do that.

    Sam Willis

    No. It’s all work and no play there, isn’t it? Beneath it, it’s wonderful actually, if you think about the animals that died to make that photograph, and here you’ve got one, you’ve got a seal, a sealion?

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, a sealion.

    Sam Willis

    A sealion playing, playing in a forest is what that sealion is doing. Yeah, sort of spinning around looking at his, or her, flippers having a truly wonderful time. I’d like to swim around in there. But that gives a sense of the sort of three-dimensional craziness in colour, and you know, the physicality of what the seabed can look like,

    Laura Boon

    It’s in a kelp forest, which is made up of this kind of giant, brown seaweeds. And this is a habitat that we don’t think very much about. But actually, is really, really important, both as a place for kind of species to breed and live. But also, it does a great job of capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and producing oxygen. So, a really vital ecosystem, but perhaps one that hasn’t had as much attention as things like coral reefs underwater.

    Sam Willis

    Yeah, with all of these, they change, that’s the whole point. They are changing, they have changed over time. They will look different in the future, which means even though it’s a completely natural image there, it’s got its own history that you know, and you can get a real sense of impending change maybe. Corey Arnold let’s see what he’s been up to. Hello Corey. Corey has worked seasonally as a fisher in Alaska since 1995 on the salmon and crab boats. And we’ve got some remarkable images here.

    Laura Boon

    So, Corey, as you said, works as a commercial fisherman. He now is Captain of his own boat. And he spends three months every year as part of the fishing community of the largest kind of salmon run in the world. So, his photos are really great at exploring both the relationship that people have with the sea and they have with the fish and have kind of the extreme weathers. In front of us, there is an image of someone really being battered by the waves on the ship.

    Sam Willis

    It almost needs an audio sound to go with that of a huge bang as a wave crashes into the bowels of this ship. And it’s taken a split second afterwards where this fisherman is surrounded by spray.

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, it’s an incredible image, just capturing that perfect moment. But he also explores, like many of our photographers, the kind of sense of community and also fun that’s happening on these boats. So, one image that I’ve always impressed with is the image of someone doing a handstand on a rather icy deck at sea.

    Sam Willis

    Do you know what, I think it’s the most dangerous photograph I’ve ever seen. Literally, it is someone upside down on an icy moving deck, I mean falling in is not going to be great, is it.

    Laura Boon

    Incredible, incredible skill.

    Sam Willis

    You know, you get a real sense of the kind of the joy and the camaraderie, and also how close you are to nature and how being at sea puts you in a unique position of awareness of the world around you. You get a lot of this in diaries in the 17th and 18th century and people who’ve never been to sea, just sort of going: ‘this is completely unbelievable, I’ve seen stuff I’ve never seen before, and it brings them closer to nature, which is why I think this whole exhibition is so important. This one – he’s hugging, an enormous salmon covered in blood; it’s his best friend.

    Laura Boon

    Yeah. So that photo of the person, there’s just a very joyous look on his face. And Corey says for him this really sums up the relationship between the fisher and the fish. There is a love there, as it were, within the slight brutality, perhaps.

    Sam Willis

    And then to the right of it, so you’ve got him with his fishy friend, and then his actual friends. Let’s go and have a look at this.

    Laura Boon

    So, the photo in front of us shows a kind of, a group of people, on a kind of disused and very derelict boat. And this is part of the community that gather each year at a place called graveyard point, in Alaska, it’s a disused salmon cannery. And they basically kind of almost like squat there every year for the fishing season. And Corey, as part of that community, he photographs it, and I think this group shots really great. Every time I look at it I notice something slightly different in someone’s face, or it’s just a wonderful group shot.

    Sam Willis

    I should think there are 19, I think 19, people here all crowded onto a grey wreck, there are all these people are wearing brightly, brightly coloured fishing clothes and they’re against the backdrop of a grey, knackered, ship. Yeah, and again, it comes back to this sort of, this funny, mixture of camaraderie and isolation.

    Laura Boon

    And slightly kind of poignantly to this image, is just to the right, we have a protest flag, which just has Pebble Mine with a big crossed red out on it. And this is currently a community that feels like its way of life, and their kind of continuation, is threatened by a proposed metal mine, called Pebble Mine, that is proposed to be developed just upstream. So, Corey is heavily opposed to the mine and he himself and a lot of other people are arguing that if it goes ahead, it’s going to lead to a huge drop in water quality, which would affect the salmon run, which is currently managed sustainably, and really kind of threatened both their way of life and that of the indigenous local people.

    Sam Willis

    It makes you realize that everyone in this photograph, all of these 19 people, everyone’s got their own lives, their own background, their own reasons for being there, their own contemporary interests, but it will be coloured in one way or another by how they make their living.

    Laura Boon

    Definitely, and all of them, yeah, they come from all over the US and even further afield and just united for this kind of fishing season. It’s quite interesting actually, Corey himself, although he was always interested in fishing, he started fishing with his dad, the reason why he became a commercial fisherman is because he graduated into one of the economic crashes. He realized that he was unlikely to be able to make money as a commercial photographer. So instead, he became a crab fisherman, which there’s the image in front of us, which is the self-portray on the crabbing vessel.

    Sam Willis

    Let’s have a quick look at that. I can’t quite see it.

    Laura Boon

    So, he’s perched on top of these giant cages, it’s

     Sam Willis

    Wow!

    Laura Boon

    Yeah!

    Sam Willis

    I’m surprised, he’s not doing a handstand? So, seriously precarious!

    Laura Boon

    Yeah, seriously precarious.

    Sam Willis

    You’ve got these crab pots, there must be 1, 2, 3, there must be 30 crab pots, 50 crab pots. He’s on top of them working with a crane, which is preparing to lift one-off, and I suspect cast it into the sea. So that’ll be baited and ready to go.

    Laura Boon

    And just really heavy wave action. It’s pitch black.

    Sam Willis

    I wonder if anyone did a risk assessment for that job. Because I mean, it’d be a miracle if he came back with all of his fingers.

    Laura Boon

    So, crabbing, especially at this time, there’s been a few more safety measures that have come in, was extremely dangerous. But you can get quite a high price for the crabs, perhaps as a reflection of that. So that’s how he became a fisherman really.

    Sam Willis

    It’s a wonderful story, I mean, to say, and also it reminds you that seafaring, you know, it’s always been a dangerous occupation. And it really, it marks and scars people, I think it will certainly change the way they think about life. And you’ve really brought that to life here, it’s wonderful. So how would people come and see the exhibition? We’re talking because, it’s a silly question, but we are in lockdown. What are your plans for opening up?

    Laura Boon

    So, we are hoping to open as soon as legally possible. And then like many museums, were operating a ticket system, the tickets are completely free, but you just need to go onto our website to book a ticket. And then we’re operating under COVID safe spacing. You’ll notice that the exhibition feels quite airy, which is great, but it’s been designed with COVID spacing in mind. So, there’s definitely plenty of space to socially distance within the exhibition.

    Sam Willis

    And I’d encourage everyone who’s listening to this to do their best to come and see it, it’s inspirational, and I think life-affirming and life-changing. It’s wonderful. Well done.

    Laura Boon

    Thank you.

    Sam Willis

    Well, I do hope you have enjoyed this episode. And if you want to help out, please do everything you can to spread the word. And the best thing you can do of course, if you’re not a member already, is join the Society for Nautical Research @snr.org.uk. You can find us all over social media do please get in touch, and we’ll be back soon with another episode.

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