The Titanic Enquiry2: Lady Duff Gordon

October 2023

In this, the first of four dramatisations of witness testimony given at the British Titanic Inquiry of May 1912, we hear directly from Lady Duff Gordon. A First Class passenger, and one of only two passengers interviewed at the inquiry (the other being her husband), Lady Duff Gordon was also one of only three women to give testimony. Along with her husband, she was also one of only two witnesses to actually request to be interviewed. Lady Duff Gordon’s perspective, therefore, is unusual and significant in many ways and makes for riveting listening, casting an entirely new light on the tragedy.

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    Sam Willis 

    From the Society for nautical research in partnership with Lloyd’s Register Foundation, I’m Sam Willis. And this is the Mariners Mirror podcast, the world’s number one podcast dedicated to all of maritime history. Hello, everyone and welcome to the Mariners Mirror podcast, and today a significant new strand of the podcast. This is the first of several episodes that are a dramatic recreations of testimonies given at the British Titanic inquiry. This has all been made possible by the fantastic Titanic Inquiry Project. You can find it at TitanicInquiry.org, where they’ve been slowly but relentlessly transcribing 1000s of pages of testimony. Let me read a little to you about why they have taken on this Herculean task in their own words. The sinking of the passenger liner Titanic in 1912, is one of those historical events that has always captured the imagination of researchers and the general public alike. Drama, pathos, cowardice, heroism, and self sacrifice. All our vital parts of the story of the greatest tragedy to have taken place at sea up to that time, but legends have sometimes become part of the Titanic saga too. And many of these legends have arisen solely because the public has not had easy access to accurate, well documented information about the tragedy. books about the Titanic are bound but in a sense, these books serve as filters of primary historical sources and put the reader one step further away from those people who actually experienced the Titanic disaster themselves. Although many Titanic survivors did testify about their experiences at the two government inquiries that were conducted after the disaster. The transcripts of these two inquiries were never commonly available to the general public and have become increasingly difficult for researchers to obtain as the years go by. Until now, a small and selfless group of serious Titanic researchers has recently gone through the incredible effort of transcribing the entire texts of both the Senate and the British Titanic Inquiries, each of which is over 1000 pages long and has graciously seen fit to post those transcripts on this website for the benefit of Titanic buffs everywhere. These researchers have reaped no financial reward for their self imposed efforts and have undertaken this project solely in the interest of making hard to find historical information available to everyone who might wish to see it. So there you are, that is what the Titanic inquiry is, in their own words. Now, if you want to find out more about the actual project, please listen to the dedicated podcast I have recently published, in which our interview Rob Optimas is a driving force behind everything. Today we hear the fascinating testimony of Lady Duff-Gordon. There were only three women called to testify at the Titanic inquiry two stewardesses and Lady Duff -Gordon, Lucy Duff-Gordon along with her husband so Cosmo Duff-Gordon had the distinction of being the only two Titanic passengers called to testify before the wreck Commissioner, not because they’d seen something extraordinary during the sinking, but rather because they, along with only 10 others had made their escape in a lifeboat designed to hold 40 people, the absence of testimony from any other passengers at all, first class to steer edges, I believe one of the most intriguing aspects of this inquiry. Now Lady Duff-Gordon was born Lucy Christiana Sutherland on the 13th of June 1863 in London. Her father died when she was very young and Lucy and her sister were raised by their mother and stepfather. Her first marriage at the age of 18 to James Wallace ended in divorce after infidelity on both sides. Left in meagre circumstances, Lucy began making and selling dresses and soon rented a shop she called Maison Lucille in London. Now, her dresses quickly became very popular. She was a very talented lady. Indeed, she expanded the business, eventually opening shops in New York, Chicago and Paris and became a celebrated fashion designer. In 1900. She married Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon, descended from a Scottish aristocratic family and a well known fencer. He represented Great Britain in the 1906 games. He won silver in the team epee event and went on to help organise the 1908 Summer Olympics which were held in London. His background and connections brought Lucy additional avenues of very good business including none other than Queen Mary herself. And now according to Lucy and Cosmo, they were not actually planning on sailing on Titanic, but business needs necessitated that they take the first available vessel. She recalled enjoying the ship and how the voyage was uneventful until the collision. Following their escape from the sinking ship Lucy commented to her secretary Laura Francatelli there is your beautiful night dress gone. One of the firemen who was in the same lifeboat was annoyed by the comment and replied that the Duff-Gordon’s could replace all they lost but that the crew had all lost their entire kit and their pay ended when Titanic went down. Afterwards, on board Carpathia the other ship that came to rescue those survivors. So Cosmo and Lady Duff-Gordon presented each member of the boat crew with a check, purportedly to replace their lost kits, and they had a picture taken of the boat survivors. This gift spurred speculation that the crew had been bribed to stay clear of the people in the water and not attempt to return to pick them up. The press first in America but also increasingly in England began to question if the gift was indeed a bribe to keep the boat from returning to collect others. The Duff-Gordon’s eager to protect themselves requested to testify before the Wreck Commissioner to clear themselves. So, now come with me to the Wreck Commissioner’s court, Scottish Drill Hall, Buckingham gate, Westminster, in May 1912. On the 11th day of the inquiry, where it Lady Duff-Gordon has taken her seat. And Sir Rufus Isaacs, the attorney general, has risen to his feet.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Lady Duff-Gordon, you will remember on the night of the disaster to the ‘Titanic,’ you were awakened, I think by the collision.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I was.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Now I only want you to tell me one thing before we get to the boat. Had there been offers for you to go into any of the other lifeboats?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, yes, they came and tried to drag me away.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Yeah. You mean some of the sailors?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    The sailors. I was holding my husband’s arm, they were very anxious that I should go.

     

    Attorney-General 

    And you refused to go?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Absolutely.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Well, eventually, you did go with your husband, as we know, in what has been called the emergency boat?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, I did.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Just tell us quite shortly. I do not want to go into it in any detail. But quite shortly, how was it you went into that boat? Do you remember?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, quite well.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Well, would you tell my lord?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    After the three boats had gone down, my husband, Miss Franks and myself were left standing on the deck. There were no other people on the deck at all visible. And I’d quite made up my mind that I was going to be drowned. And then suddenly, we saw this little boat in front of us, this little thing. And we saw some sailors and an officer apparently giving them orders. And I said to my husband, aught we not to be doing something? He said, “No, we must wait for orders.” And we stood there for quite some time while these men were fixing up things. And then my husband went forward and said, “Might we get into this boat?” And the officer said in a very polite way indeed “Oh, certainly do I will be very pleased.” Then someone hitched me up from the deck and pitched me into the boat. And then I think Miss Franks was pitched in. It was not a case of getting in at all. We could not have got in it was quite high. They pitched us up in this sort of way, you know, into the boat. And after we had been in a little while the boat was started to be lowered. And one American gentleman got pitched in. And one American gentleman was pitched in while the boat was being lowered down.

     

    Attorney-General 

    I think it is right to say that Mr. Stengel rather confirms that statement if your lordship will remember. It is not right, according to him, that the three of them came running up. As Simmons said, he says he did come in up afterwards and was rolled into the boat. Now, you will remember when you got into the boat, and before the Titanic sank, did the men start rowing away from the ‘Titanic?’

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, the moment we touched the water, the men began rowing.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Had you heard any orders given?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Do you remember what they were?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    As far as I can remember, it was to row quickly away from the boat for about 200 yards.

     

    Attorney-General 

    And to come back if called upon?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    You did not hear that?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, no.

     

    Attorney-General 

    I do not quite understand.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I did not hear that.

     

    Attorney-General 

    You did not hear it.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    As far as you knew all they had to do was to row out about 200 yards?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    And did then the men commence doing that?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    At once.

     

    Attorney-General 

    And did you hear any conversation at all in the boat before the Titanic sank?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you understand the question I was putting to you?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, I did not hear it. In our little boat?

     

    Attorney-General 

    Yes.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    She said no.

     

    Attorney-General 

    But I have her proof before me. And that is why I was not sure she understood the question.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I have no recollection.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Let me ask you again. I’m speaking to you of before the ‘Titanic’ sank. You understand?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    What I am asking you is, before she sank, did you hear the men saying anything in the boat?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you hear anything said about suction?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Well, perhaps I may have heard it but I was terribly sick. And I could not swear to it.

     

    Attorney-General 

    What?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I was awfully sick. I did not think I could swear to it.

     

    Attorney-General 

    I am asking you about something which I understand you have said quite recently.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Read it to her.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, will you please?

     

    Attorney-General 

    I’m asking you about something which I only know from your statement to your solicitor. Did you hear a voice say “Let us get away?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, I think so.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you hear it said “It is such an enormous boat. None of us know what the suction may be if she is a goner?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, I heard them speak of the enormous boat. It was the word suction I was not sure of. I see what you mean.

     

    Attorney-General 

    It is not what I mean, Lady Duff-Gordon. It is what you are said to have said to your solicitor.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Well, I may have said so.

     

    Attorney-General 

    “Such an enormous boat.” That is referring to the ‘Titanic’?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    “None of us know what the suction may be if she is a goner.”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    That was I am sure long before the ‘Titanic’ sank.

     

    Attorney-General 

    That is what I was asking you.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    I put it to you. But I do not think you appreciated the question.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, I did not.

     

    Attorney-General 

    It was before the ‘Titanic’ sank?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, it was before.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Now, after the ‘Titanic’ sank, you still continued to be seasick I understand?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, terribly.

     

    Attorney-General 

    I only want to ask you one question about that. Tell me first of all, do you recollect very well what happened when you were in the boat?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Your mind is hazy about it?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Very.

     

    Attorney-General 

    There may have been some talk which you would not recollect I suppose?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Well, I do not know.

     

    Attorney-General 

    You think you might?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I think I won’t.

     

    Attorney-General 

    I will put to you definitely what is said with reference to yourself. Did you hear after the ‘Titanic’  had sunk the cries of the people who were drowning?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No after the ‘Titanic’ sank I never heard a cry.

     

    Attorney-General 

    You never heard anything?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, not after the ‘Titanic’ sank.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you not hear cries at all?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, before she sank. Terrible cries.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Before she sank?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you see her sink?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I did.

     

    Attorney-General 

    You mean you heard nothing at all after that?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    My impression was that there was absolute silence.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Were your men rowing?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Attorney-General 

    What all the time?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, that they began to row as soon as the boat went down.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you hear a proposal made that you should go back to where the ‘Titanic’ was sunk?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you hear any shouting in your boat? It would be better if you attend to me.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I’m listening.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you hear anybody shout out in the boat that you ought to go back?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    With the object of saving people who were in the ‘Titanic?’

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Attorney-General 

    You knew there were people in the ‘Titanic’ did you not?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, I did not think so. I do not think I was thinking anything about it.

     

    Attorney-General 

    Did you say that it would be dangerous to go back, that you might get swamped?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    There is one question. Have you seen in the London ‘Daily News’ what purports to be an article especially written by yourself in America?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I have.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Did you write such an article?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    It is an entire invention from beginning to end?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Which article?

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    The one in the ‘Daily News’ which appeared on the 20th of April.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, it is rather inventive. A man wrote it from what he thought he heard me saying.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Do you mean to say that somebody came to interview?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, quantities of people came to interview me.

     

    The Commissioner 

    But this particular man from the ‘Daily News?’

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, he did not. He was a friend having supper with us the night we arrived.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Will you kindly look at that article?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    What am I supposed to say?

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    If you will look at the heading of the second column on this side, you will see that it is an article supposed to be specially written by you. And what purports to be your signature appears at the foot of the column.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Are you looking at it now, Lady Duff-Gordon, for the first time?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    For the first time.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Do you mean to say you have never seen the ‘Daily News’ with that article in it up to today?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Never. This is the first time. The last little bit here is absolutely a story.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Absolutely what?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    A story.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Then if your signature appears there it is a forgery, is it?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, absolutely.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    Do you mind letting me see that? I have never seen it till this moment.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    I want to use it for a moment. You say that a friend came and had supper with you, and you suggest he is responsible for what appears here?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I know he is.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    You know he is?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Some of it may be true and some of it may be false?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Would you like me to tell you the story?

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    I should like you to answer the question. Is this true that you “Watched several women and children and some men climb into the lifeboats?” And did an officer say,”‘Lady Gordon? Are you ready?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    It is untrue.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is this true? “I said to my husband. Well, we might as well take a boat, although the trip will only be a little pleasure excursion until the morning.”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Quite untrue.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    That is untrue. Is it untrue that you said “It was the captain’s special boat, that five Stoker’s got in and two Americans – Mr. Salomon, of New York, and Mr. Stengel of Newark?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I do not remember saying that.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    It is true, is it not, that that number of persons did get in?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    It was Mr. Salomon and Mr. Stengel and Miss Frank’s, my husband and myself. We were the passengers.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    “Besides those two passengers, there was Sir Cosmo, myself, Miss Frank’s, an English girl.” Is it true you said that?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I think that might easily be.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is this true that you said this? “Numbers of men standing by joked with us because we were going out on the ocean?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, that is not true.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    That is an invention?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Absolutely.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is it true that you said that “Some of them said the ship cannot sink? And that one of them said ‘You will get your death of cold out there amid the ice.'” Is that true?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No. Not true.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is it true that you said you were “Slung off and cruised around for two hours, and it did not seem very cold?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Quite untrue.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is it true that you said “I suddenly clutched the sides of the  lifeboat. I have seen the ‘Titanic’ give a curious shiver.” That is invention is it?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, quite.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Did you say “Everything could be clearly made out, there were no lights on the ship save for a few lanterns?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is this true that you said this? “We watched her, we were 200 yards away, go down slowly, almost peacefully.”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Did you say then “An awful silence seemed to hang over everything. And then from the water all about where the Titanic had been arose a bedlam of shrieks and cries.”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No. I never said that.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    That is entirely untrue?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Absolutely.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    And is it true that you said this –

     

    The Commissioner 

    Who was this gentleman?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    He was the editor of the Sunday American. His name was Mr. Merrett.

     

    The Commissioner 

    What is the ‘Sunday American?’

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    It is a newspaper.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Is it published in London?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Where is it published?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    In New York, I could tell you exactly how it came out if I were allowed to.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Is this true that you said this? “Women and men were clinging to bits of wreckage in the icy water?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    “And it was at least an hour before the awful chorus of shriek ceased gradually dying into a moment of despair?”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No, I never said that.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Did you say this? “I remember the very last cry. It was a man’s voice calling loudly. ‘My God, My God.’ He cried monotonously in a dull, hopeless way.” That is untrue?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Absolutely untrue.

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    “And we waited gloomily in the boats through the rest of the night stoker’s rowing as hard as they could to keep themselves warm.”

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Quite untrue.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    May I borrow that?

     

    Mr. Clement Edwards 

    Yes.

     

    Mr. Lewis 

    Do you write for any American papers at all?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes, the ‘Sunday American.’

     

    Mr. Lewis 

    Did you supply an article to the ‘Evening Herald?’

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    I do not think Lady Duff-Gordon can hear; I cannot – whether “he” wrote or “she.”

     

    Attorney-General 

    She?

     

    Mr. Lewis 

    Do you write in the ‘Evening Herald?’

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    No.

     

    The Commissioner 

    Mr. Duke, do you wish to ask anything?

     

    Mr. Duke 

    Yes, My Lord. I think Lady Duff-Gordon should explain about this article. When you were at New York, you went to an hotel?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    And that evening, you had supper together with your husband?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Several people – six ladies.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    Did Mr. Merrett come there?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    Was he a gentleman you had known?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    A great friend of ours.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    Had you any idea of any publication of anything at that time?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    What did he say to you?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    After he left us about half-an-hour he telephoned to me, and he said, “Mr. Hurst has just rung me up and must have your story of the ‘Titanic’ wreck for tomorrow morning’s newspaper.” He said, “May I tell your story as I have heard it?”

     

    Mr. Duke 

    What did you say?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    I said yes. And he tells me afterwards that he telephoned to their head office all he knew about it, and then a clever reporter put all that into words and it appeared the next morning in the ‘New York American.’

     

    Mr. Duke 

    Your friend told some clever American reporter what he had heard?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Yes.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    And then you were advertised as having written and signed this false article?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    That is it.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    And was that published in various papers did you find?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Oh, all over – everywhere.

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    But

     

    Mr. Duke 

    You had not seen this in the ‘Daily News’ till when?

     

    Lady Duff-Gordon 

    Just now; here.

     

    Mr. Duke 

    I think that is all I need ask.

     

    Sam Willis 

    Thank you all so much for listening. I hope you enjoyed that. I’ve really enjoyed putting it all together. It’s been something of a mammoth task, and I must thank the people who have made it possible. The names of the actors to begin with, you must know them. The wonderful Elaine Kingston was Lady Duff-Gordon, John Plews was the Attorney General, Daniel Jamieson was John Bingham, the wreck Commissioner, Jamie White was Clement Edwards and Robin Corden appeared as Mr. Duke. And none of this of course would have been possible or practical without those researchers who transcribed it all we have Bob Bonnell, Earl Chapman, Mike Disabato, Vera and John Gillespie, Linda Grieves, Jane Hilbert, Rob Ottmers, Stuart Partridge, Marilyn Powell, Susie Powell, Park Stevenson, Bruce Trank, and Bill Wormstead. A wonderful contribution there, some really brilliant citizen historians, I salute you all. Now please make sure you check out our fantastic YouTube channel where you can see a number of important animations concerning the Titanic, a 3D animation based on the ship’s original lines, and also one that looks specifically at Titanic safety equipment. Please subscribe to the podcast as we’ll be releasing more testimony from the inquiry in the coming weeks. We wouldn’t want you to miss out. This podcast comes from both the Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyd’s Register Foundation. So please do all you can to look into those wonderful institutions to see what they are doing, in particular, please Google just search it up Maritime Innovation in Miniature. It’s Lloyd’s Register Foundations History and Education Center’s most recent project they are filming the world’s best ship models with the latest camera equipment and it’s absolutely fantastic. So Google that ‘Maritime Innovation in Miniature’, and please find the Society for Nautical Research snr.org.uk where you can join up! It’s a wonderful way to find out all about the world’s maritime and past from the very best in the business and a fantastic way to meet like minded people.

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